The Flower Show is upon us. The Philly tradition — revered, refined, and resplendent — opens to the public this Saturday at the Convention Center. Here’s everything you need to know. One curious fact: The Flower Show holds hundreds of contests for plant growers and gardeners each year. We profiled a Penn med student who enters beauties from his exotic bug-eating plant collection.

Good causes abound in the coming week: There’s a silent auction for the late Willis ‘Nomo’ Humphrey, a muralist who contributed gorgeous portraits to the city’s landscape; FringeArts puts on a heartwarming play about the history of disability rights advocates in Pennsylvania; and a free six-week class on recycling is kicking off at the Wagner Free Institute of Science.

There’s plenty more below, including the Harlem Globetrotters, a beer festival at the Navy Yard, Deerhunter, and a visit from two original band members of The Monkees. — Jenn Ladd (@jrladd, jladd@philly.com)

A scene from 2017's Philadelphia Flower Show.
Matt Rourke / AP
A scene from 2017's Philadelphia Flower Show.

ART

Willis `Nomo’ Humphrey auction

A former Mural Arts staffer, Willis “Nomo” Humphrey was known for his masterly portraits of black legends, including Martin Luther King Jr., The Roots, and Bishop Richard Allen of the A.M.E. Church. Humphrey passed away unexpectedly in November. This exhibit and silent auction, featuring works donated by local artists, will raise funds for Humphrey’s three children. Direct donations can also be made on the family’s GoFundMe page. — Grace Dickinson

6 to 9 p.m., Friday, also noon to 5 p.m., Saturday, Crane Arts Icebox Project Space, 1400 N. American St., free, cranearts.com

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

Meet the Women of the Betsy Ross House

Bring the family to the Betsy Ross House for a celebration of colonial-era female entrepreneurs. Guests will meet chocolatier Mary Crathorne, former Betsy Ross House owner Hannah Lithgow, and Phillis the laundress, a freed slave who provides a glimpse of a working woman’s life. Betsy will also be onsite, presented at three ages: the young rebel, the musket cartridge maker, and the grandmother. — G.D.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Betsy Ross House, 239 Arch St., $10, historicphiladelphia.org

Courtney Mitchell, as washerwoman Phillis, talks to Betsy Ross House visitors about colonial-era women's work.
Courtney Mitchell, as washerwoman Phillis, talks to Betsy Ross House visitors about colonial-era women's work.

FLEA MARKET

Vegan Pop Flea: Sprung for Spring Market

This pop-up market is your chance to get back in the spring flea-market groove. Enjoy vegan comfort food and treats, pierogies and baklava, from the vegan convenience store V Marks the Shop and Tattooed Mom. Shop in the bar’s colorful confines for spices, soaps, handmade jewelry, candles, and more from Philly artisans. —Thea Applebaum Licht

1 to 5 p.m., Sunday, Tattooed Mom, 530 South St., free, 215-238-9880, tattooedmomphilly.com

DRINKS

Philly Craft Beer Festival

More than 75 breweries and 200 beers and ciders will be represented at this festival, featuring activities like giant Jenga, cornhole, and ax-throwing. Soak up the samples with options from food trucks like Philly Fry, Grilly Cheese, and Baby Blues BBQ. — G.D.

1:30 to 5 p.m., Saturday, Building 611 in the Navy Yard, 1100 Flagship Ave., $46 for general admission, $12 for designated drivers, phillycraftbeerfest.com

The Philly Craft Beer Festival at the Navy Yard features more than 75 breweries and 200 beers and ciders.
APRIL SAUL / Inquirer Staff Photographer
The Philly Craft Beer Festival at the Navy Yard features more than 75 breweries and 200 beers and ciders.

Kombucha-Making Workshop

Learn how to brew fizzy kombucha, a beverage made from fermented tea, at Cherry Hill’s Natural Health Improvement Center. Watch a demo on getting started and take home all the necessary materials for making the gut-friendly drink yourself (included in the ticket price). — G.D.

6:15 to 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Natural Health Improvement Center of South Jersey, 1020 Kings Hwy. North #110, Cherry Hill,$10, facebook.com/NHICSouthJersey

THEATER

A Fierce Kind of Love at FringeArts

Artists with and without disabilities put on this show about the story of Pennsylvania’s intellectual disability rights movement, which sought to reform the state’s educational and advocacy policies starting in the 1970s. Drawing from years of research and performers’ experiences, A Fierce Kind of Love documents the movement’s struggles and successes. The show will have real-time captioning, sign-language interpretation, audio descriptions at each show, and plenty of wheelchair seating. — G.D.

Friday to Sunday, FringeArts, 140 N. Christopher Columbus Blvd., $15-$31, fringearts.com

'A Fierce Kind of Love' tells the story of Pennsylvania's intellectual disability rights movement and features a cast with and without disabilities. It appears Mar. 1 to 3, 2019, at FringeArts.
JJ Tiziou
'A Fierce Kind of Love' tells the story of Pennsylvania's intellectual disability rights movement and features a cast with and without disabilities. It appears Mar. 1 to 3, 2019, at FringeArts.

MUSEUM

Paleopalooza

Dive into two days of dinosaur bones and fossil fun at the Academy of Natural Sciences’ Paleopalooza this weekend. The festival features discussions with paleontologists, rarely exhibited fossils, a guided dinosaur tour, and meet-and-greets with live reptiles. Purchase tickets online for $2 off admission. — G.D.

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy., free with admission, ansp.org

Skulls of Tyrannosaurus rex (left) and Triceratops are in Dinosaur Hall. "Paleopalooza" is a two-day festival for the family at the Academy of Natural Sciences this weekend.
Skulls of Tyrannosaurus rex (left) and Triceratops are in Dinosaur Hall. "Paleopalooza" is a two-day festival for the family at the Academy of Natural Sciences this weekend.

SPORTS

The Harlem Globetrotters’ 2019 World Tour

Catch the hilarious, historic Harlem Globetrotters slam-dunking and front flipping across the basketball courts at both the Liacouras Center and Wells Fargo Center this weekend. The athletic comedy troupe will perform three shows in Philadelphia as part of a tour set to take them as far as Singapore and Australia. — G.D.

7 p.m., Friday, the Liacouras Center, 1776 N. Broad St.; also noon and 5 p.m., Sunday, Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St., cost varies per event, harlemglobetrotters.com/tickets

The Harlem Globetrotters return to Philadelphia this weekend to perform three shows out on the basketball courts of the Liacouras Center and Wells Fargo Center.
Courtesy Harlem Globetrotters
The Harlem Globetrotters return to Philadelphia this weekend to perform three shows out on the basketball courts of the Liacouras Center and Wells Fargo Center.

MUSIC

Sunflower Bean

The New York trio Sunflower Bean embraces its punk-rock roots both on its raucous new EP, King of the Dudes, and by taking a break from opening for Interpol and Courtney Barnett to headline a show in the basement of the First Unitarian Church. Singer Julia Cumming growls and swaggers like Joan Jett, whether on the glam-rock title track or the new wave bubblegum of “Come to Me.” The EP is fun, focused, and bitter; it’s less wide-ranging than last year’s excellent Twentytwo in Blue, but the trio will have plenty of time to blast through songs old and new on Friday. — Steve Klinge

8 p.m., Friday, First Unitarian Church, 2125 Chestnut St., $15. 215-821-7575, r5productions.com

Deerhunter

The members of Deerhunter are 15 years into a career as a formidable guitar band that follows leader Bradford Cox’s intellectual pursuits and experimental impulses while also excelling at wistful, formalist pop. The band’s eighth album, Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?, was coproduced by Scottish songwriter Cate Le Bon and largely recorded in Cox’s isolated Marfa, Texas, outpost. It contains songs that consider the Russian Revolution, James Dean during the filming of the 1956 movie Giant, and the French philosopher Guy Debord, but rarely does it get weighed down by high seriousness. Opener is L’Rain, who is Brooklyn songwriter Taja Cheek. — Dan DeLuca

8:30 p.m. Friday at Union Transfer, 1026 Spring Garden St. $25. 215-232-2100. utphilly.com

Deerhunter, led by Bradford Cox, performs at Union Transfer on Friday.
Colin Kerrigan/Phrequency.com
Deerhunter, led by Bradford Cox, performs at Union Transfer on Friday.

Grandchildren

For the last 10 years, Philadelphia’s Grandchildren — anchored by songwriting instrumentalist Aleks Martray and singer Shari Bolar — have sauntered through a provocative series of different-sounding albums, each touching on elements of their musical inspiration: electronic, folk, and pop. While the duo’s Everlasting (2010), Golden Age (2013), and ZUNI (2015) were all glittering studio creations, the upcoming self-titled release Grandchildren showcases the pair’s richly diverse sounds in a live, raw setting. — A.D. Amorosi

9 p.m., Friday, Johnny Brenda’s, 1201 N. Frankford Ave., $12, johnnybrendas.com

Philadelphia band Grandchildren play Johnny Brenda's Friday, March 1, 2019.
Courtesy of Big Hassle Media
Philadelphia band Grandchildren play Johnny Brenda's Friday, March 1, 2019.

Alan Parsons Live Project

Alan Parsons started his career as a teenaged recording engineer at London’s famed EMI (now Abbey Road) Studios. He went on to work on the Beatles’ last two albums, then engineered Pink Floyd’s classic Dark Side of the Moon a few years later. But it wasn’t until 1977 that Parsons himself stepped into the limelight with I Robot, the second recording with his then studio-only prog-rock band, the Alan Parsons Project. A catchy single — “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You” — helped propel the album to platinum status in the U.S. Other hits (“Time,” “Eye in the Sky”) followed. In the decades since, the multi-instrumentalist has kept busy by recording and producing, as well as launching the educational DVD series The Art and Science of Sound Recording (narrated by Billy Bob Thornton). Parsons’ first solo CD in 15 years, The Secret, is set for April release, and he’ll likely share some new tracks onstage. — Nicole Pensiero

7:30 p.m., Sunday, Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside, $39.50 to $79.50, 215-572-7650, keswicktheater.com

Cass McCombs

“Help me, Armageddon, help me, Armagdeddon / Help me to be calm,” intones Cass McCombs on “Sleeping Volcanoes,” the first single from his ninth album, Tip of the Sphere. It’s an apt mantra for the mesmeric singer-songwriter, who chooses to face the abyss with tantric calm rather than panic. Whether uncoiling the wiry guitar lines of “Sidewalk Bop After Suicide” or musing on the Elton John-by-way-of-Harry Nilsson saloon piano on “Absentee,” McCombs hones the hazy folk-psych of the Grateful Dead and the meditative drones of Indian raga into a stumbling-toward-transcendence sensation — making wry and incisive observations on all-too-human mistakes from an ironic but enlightened distance. With Sam Evian. — Shaun Brady

8 p.m., Tuesday, World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St., $20-$22, 215-222-1400, worldcafelive.com

Two of the four original Monkees come to the Keswick on Wednesday, March 6, 2019.
AP
Two of the four original Monkees come to the Keswick on Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

The Monkees featuring Micky Dolenz and Mike Nesmith

Although the Monkees have toured regularly in recent decades, it was rarely with all four original members — even before Davy Jones died in 2012. Even this year’s Christmas album lacked a track featuring multiple Monkees. So Wednesday’s show, with drummer/vocalist Micky Dolenz and guitarist/songwriter Mike Nesmith fronting an eight-piece band, seemed simply a new Monkees permutation when it was announced last fall. But now its tone will inevitably be colored by last week’s passing of keyboardist and funnyman Peter Tork. The show is for fans and superfans, promising hits as well as deep cuts, with an emphasis on Nesmith’s compositions. Tork will be on everyone’s mind, too. — S.K.

8 p.m., Wednesday, Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave, Glenside, $49.50 - $127.50, 215-572-7650, keswicktheatre.com