Saturday, August 1, 2015

Gino's closes King of Prussia location

This location - which lacked a drive-through - was the first to reopen in October 2010 by CEO Tom Romano, who had worked for the Maryland-based company for decades and was instrumental in reviving it.

Gino's closes King of Prussia location

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The Gino Giant, signature sandwich at Gino´s Burgers & Chicken.  (SARAH J. GLOVER / Staff Photographer)
The Gino Giant, signature sandwich at Gino's Burgers & Chicken. (SARAH J. GLOVER / Staff Photographer)

Gino’s Burgers & Chicken, the resurrected fast-food brand, said today it had closed the location across from the King of Prussia mall at 611 W. DeKalb Pike in King of Prussia.

In a statement, Gino's called the closing the result of "growing pains."

This location - which lacked a drive-through - was the first to reopen in October 2010 by CEO Tom Romano, who had worked for the Maryland-based company for decades and was instrumental in reviving it.

Gino's rode the first swells of the current burger wave and hoped to attract nostalgists as its customers.

Romano said the company plans to re-enter the Philadelphia market with a franchise on the Main Line before the end of the year. 

Gino’s Burgers & Chicken currently operates five Maryland franchises including a concession at the home of the Baltimore Orioles in Camden Yards. Gino’s also plans to have a concession at M and T Field, home of the Baltimore Ravens this coming season.

More than 20 franchises have been awarded in the Philadelphia and Baltimore markets to date, the company said. A Bensalem franchise location closed in February.

The original Gino’s Inc., which started in 1958, was named after Baltimore Colts hall of famer Gino Marchetti. Gino's grew to 360 restaurants from Northern Virginia through upstate New Jersey before being sold to Marriott in 1982. 

Philly.com
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Michael Klein, the editor/producer of philly.com/Food, writes about the local restaurant scene in his Inquirer column "Table Talk." Have a question? Email it! See his Inquirer work here.

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