Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

U.S. News ranks best diets of 2014

Fad diets all seem so easy. Eat this food to increase your metabolism! Try this one weird tip to lose belly fat! They sound promising, but in reality they never last and often times the results never come.

Fortunately, U.S News & World Report cut through the clutter to give you the best diets of 2014. Combing through the unending list, nationally recognized nutrition and health experts ranked the 32 most promising diets — no gimmicks, just results. Then they took the list one step further and shared which eating plans are the best fit for you. Dieting for diabetes, lowering cholesterol, or just dropping a few pounds? There’s a diet on this list for you.

The government-endorsed DASH diet took top honors again this year, winning the expert panel over for its “nutritional completeness, safety, ability to prevent or control diabetes, and role in supporting heart health.” The National Institutes of Health’s TLC diet ranked second for promoting cardiovascular health. The Mayo Clinic Diet, Weight Watchers and the Mediterranean Diet tied for third place.

Surprisingly, the Paleo Diet, which was the most-searched for diet in 2013, was ranked last on the US News list. Experts took issue with the diet on every measure, almost unanimously agreeing that duplicating a true Paleo Diet in modern times is just too difficult.

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  • Rest assured, not just any diet can hack it on this list. To be ranked, diets had to be easy to follow, nutritious and safe; as well as produce long-term weight loss, and prevent or manage diabetes and heart disease. Ya know, the practical things that every dieter hopes for when they throw away their bags of cookies and chips in favor of carrots and celery.

    Check out the full list on health.usnews.com, and start dieting the smart way.

    Kelly O'Shea Sports Medicine & Fitness Editor, Philly.com
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