Monday, August 3, 2015

Group of guys have played cross-country game of tag for 23 years because age is just a number

A group of men who became friends while attending Gonzaga Preparatory School in Washington have been carrying on a game of tag for 23 years.

Group of guys have played cross-country game of tag for 23 years because age is just a number

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Friends Bill Akers, Patrick Schultheis, Sean Raftis and Mike Konesky have been playing a 23-year game of tag across the country. Image via Sean Raftis and the Wall Street Journal.
Friends Bill Akers, Patrick Schultheis, Sean Raftis and Mike Konesky have been playing a 23-year game of tag across the country. Image via Sean Raftis and the Wall Street Journal. Image via Sean Raftis, Wall Street Journal

A group of men who became friends while attending Gonzaga Preparatory School in Washington have been carrying on a game of tag for 23 years. The game is only alive during February and has incorporated a bit of manifest destiny into its rules. One of the guys is a lawyer and drew up a contract stipulating the rules (tag-backs aren't allowed, so don't even think about it). Now, every February, the fellas get super paranoid and enlist the help of wives, friends and co-workers to try to protect themselves or get one of their buddies. Obviously, there are some risks involved, though.

What they didn't know was Sean Raftis, who was "It," had flown in from Seattle and was folded in the trunk of the Honda Accord. When the trunk was opened he leapt out and tagged Mr. Tombari, whose wife was so startled she fell backward off the curb and tore a ligament in her knee.

"I still feel bad about it," says Father Raftis, who is now a priest in Montana. "But I got Joe."

Class reunions are for boring people. This is how you should keep in touch with old friends. [Wall Street Journal]

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