Monday, September 22, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Penn State agrees to pay $60M to Sandusky child rape victims: report

The Penn State board of trustees has approved a number around $60 million to settle a majority of the claims made by people claiming convicted serial child molester Jerry Sandusky sexually abused them, according to The Inquirer.

Penn State agrees to pay $60M to Sandusky child rape victims: report

Ex-Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of 48 sex-abuse counts. He was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. (DAVID SWANSON / Staff Photographer)
Ex-Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of 48 sex-abuse counts. He was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. (DAVID SWANSON / Staff Photographer)

The Penn State board of trustees has approved a number around $60 million to settle a majority of the claims made by people claiming convicted serial child molester Jerry Sandusky sexually abused them, according to the Legal Intelligencer. Inquirer item citing Legal Intelligencer and Wall St Journal reports here. The Legal adds that 32 victims have called the school alleging they were molested by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who was convicted of child rape.

"Penn State confirmed last week that its board approved tentative settlements reached with some of the claimants at a board meeting last Friday, voting unanimously to greenlight the accords. However, the university is not expected to announce an overall dollar amount until it has settled with everyone," accordding to the report. Lawyers for some complaints are still in talks with university reps.

University President Graham Spanier and the late football coach Joe Paterno were fired for failing to stop Sandusky sooner. Spanier, Paterno and other administrators were blamed for the abuse in a university-paid report by Louis Freeh, a former FBI chief and MBNA Bank executive who currently heads Philadelphia's Pepper Hamilton law firm. Spanier and two other administrators face criminal charges, which they are fighting. Spanier has challenged the Freeh report and plans to sue. Both the university's handling of Sandusky, and its later acceptance of the Freeh report and NCAA sanctions, have provoked strong reaction among Penn State alumni. Pro-Paterno activists who reject Freeh's conclusions and the idea that the university and senior administrators share responsibility for Sandusky's assaults have been gaining influence on the Penn State board.

Joseph N. DiStefano
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PhillyDeals posts raw drafts and updates of Joseph N. DiStefano's columns and stories about Philly-area finance, investment, commercial real estate, tech, hiring and public spending, which he's been writing since 1989, mostly for the Philadelphia Inquirer.

DiStefano studied economics, history and a little engineering at Penn, taught writing at St. Joe's, and has written the book Comcasted, more than a thousand columns, and thousands of articles, and raised six children with his wife, who is a saint.

Reach Joseph N. at JoeD@phillynews.com or 215 854 5194.

Joseph N. DiStefano
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