Friday, July 3, 2015

What's in Your DVD Garden?

When winter has you in a deathlock and even the evergreens look peaked, the only sensible thing to do is to cultivate your garden.

What's in Your DVD Garden?

0 comments
Gromit (in Wallace & Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit) sizes up squash and dreams of basil.
Gromit (in Wallace & Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit) sizes up squash and dreams of basil.

When winter has you in a deathlock and even the evergreens look peaked, the only sensible thing to do is to cultivate your garden.

The Philadelphia Flower Show is always an inspiration, as are movies with lush gardens, fertile with ideas about what to do with ours. Even if you have just windowboxes or a couple of pots on the kitchen sill, DVD gardens are a wonderful way to beat the winter blues.

Confession: my favorite movie flowerbeds are guilty of what is known as "garden fraud," that is, mixing spring blooms like daffodil, tulips and peonies with midsummer flowers like roses and Oriental lilies. Still, "The Secret Garden" (1993) and "Enchanted April" (1991) boast stunning gardens you want to dream in.

Are there more abundant vegetable patches than the tomato beds in "The Godfather" (1972) and "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" (2005), where ripe fruit hangs thick as decorations on a Christmas tree? It makes you think of salad and sauce recipes.

There are formal gardens such as the cypress-lined affair in "Last Year at Marienbad" (1961), menacing gardens like the collection tended by Katharine Hepburn in "Suddenly, Last Summer" (1959) or "Little Shop of Horrors" (1986) and magic gardens like the one in "Coraline" (now in theaters). (There are also gardeners, such as Ralph Fiennes in "the Constant Gardener" (2005) and Peter Sellers in "Being There" (1980).

My all-time favorite movie garden isn't properly a garden at all: It's the field of bluebells in "Howards End" (1992), soft and lush and enchanted as a magic carpet. How does your DVD garden grow?

Film Critic
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Carrie Rickey Film Critic
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter