Prison ministry initiative gets boost

 

            The warden who supported the first Malachi Dads fatherlessness initiative in the U.S. visited Chester County last week, applauding the efforts that led to a program at the Chester County Prison a year ago.

            Louisiana State Prison Warden Burl Cain, who in 1995 walked into what was considered one of America's most dangerous prisons at Angola, met with prison officials and dozens of volunteers involved with the local Malachi Dads prison ministry program.

The local program, started by Chaplain Jack Crans, celebrated its first anniversary this month. It is the first Malachi Dads venture in the Northeast and one of the first at a county facility.

Chester County Prison Warden D. Edward McFadden said Cain was impressed with what he saw and heard. McFadden said the program is "well-supported by the community" and seems to be making a positive difference.

    Cain, who oversawv more than 5,000 inmates with an average sentence of more than 85 years, is credited with turning his institution around, first by introducing a Bible college at the site and then by adding a program to help the inmates become better fathers.

 The program gets its inspiration from  the Bible's Malachi 4:6-8: “(a)nd he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.”

            For more information on Malachi Dads, contact Steve Pacinelli at (484) 885-8118 or pnelli1@verizon.net.

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