Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Casey to Corbett: give up on Voter ID

WASHINGTON – Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) urged Gov. Corbett to wave the white flag on Pennsylvania’s controversial Voter ID law Thursday, writing that the Republican administration should forego any further appeals after losing a court ruling Monday. “At every turn Pennsylvania’s Voter ID law has been rejected by the courts,” Casey wrote in a letter sent to Corbett’s office Thursday morning and obtained by the Inquirer. “Continuing this appeal will only continue to cast a cloud of uncertainty over residents who are rightly concerned that this law will prevent them from exercising their right to vote.”

Casey to Corbett: give up on Voter ID

WASHINGTON – Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) urged Gov. Corbett to wave the white flag on Pennsylvania’s controversial Voter ID law Thursday, writing that the Republican administration should forego any further appeals after losing a court ruling Monday.

“At every turn Pennsylvania’s Voter ID law has been rejected by the courts,” Casey wrote in a letter sent to Corbett’s office Thursday morning and obtained by the Inquirer. “Continuing this appeal will only continue to cast a cloud of uncertainty over residents who are rightly concerned that this law will prevent them from exercising their right to vote.”

Casey’s letter comes three days after a Commonwealth Court judge denied the Corbett administration's request to reconsider a ruling that blocked the voter identification law.  The Corbett administration has 30 days from Monday’s decision to file an appeal to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

Casey wrote that the law would "create a barrier that would prevent tens of thousands of Pennsylvania residents from exercising their right to vote."

His letter concludes by thanking Corbett "for your time and attention to my concerns."

On Monday a spokesman for the Office of General Counsel said the office was reviewing the ruling. UPDATE: On Thursday the spokesman, Joshua Maus, said the office had no additional comment.

Republicans have argued that requiring voters to show ID will reduce fraud. Democrats, including Casey, say the law would limit access to the polls, particularly among minorities, the elderly and poor.

The law has been on hold as the legal fights have played out and was not expected to be used in the 2014 elections.


You can follow Tamari on Twitter or email him at jtamari@phillynews.com.

Jonathan Tamari
About this blog

Jonathan Tamari is the Inquirer’s Washington correspondent. He writes about the lawmakers, politics and policy that affect Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Tamari previously covered the Philadelphia Eagles and the NFL. Before that he worked in Trenton, reporting on the characters and color of New Jersey state government. He lives in Washington.

Reach Jonathan at jtamari@phillynews.com.

Jonathan Tamari
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