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Tentative deal on Pennsylvania shale-gas fee

HARRISBURG - After months of wrangling behind closed doors, Gov. Corbett and Republicans who hold the majority in both legislative chambers have reached a tentative agreement to impose a fee on the extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus Shale.

Aging pipes, deadly hazards

Sean Sellers was standing outside his Tacony home in January, a strong smell of natural gas in the air, pointing out the bubbles escaping through cracks in the street to a utility worker.

Aging pipes, deadly hazards

Sean Sellers was standing outside his Tacony home in January, a strong smell of natural gas in the air, pointing out the bubbles escaping through cracks in the street to a utility worker.

Safety cases a secret for utilities, PUC

Each year, natural gas utilities are cited for dozens of safety problems by Pennsylvania regulators.

Safety cases a secret for utilities, PUC

Each year, natural gas utilities are cited for dozens of safety problems by Pennsylvania regulators.

Eminent-domain questions divide even pipeline companies

The issue divides even pipeline companies operating in Pennsylvania: Should they have the power to bury their lines on people's land without permission?

Eminent-domain questions divide even pipeline companies

The issue divides even pipeline companies operating in Pennsylvania: Should they have the power to bury their lines on people's land without permission?
More Stories

'Us vs. Them' in Pa. Gaslands

DALLAS TOWNSHIP, Pa. - The solicitor's voice shook as he tried to explain to a hostile crowd that natural gas pipelines are perfectly legal. "If we have to have this," Tom Brennan said, "let's at least try to control it and have it on our own terms."

Environmentalists and sportsmen raise alarms over pipelines

In Lycoming County, state environmental inspectors hiked through the woods northwest of Williamsport this fall to check out a multimillion-dollar pipeline project.

Top U.S. lawmaker on pipeline rules ...

Soon after horrific natural gas explosions killed five people in Allentown and a utility worker in Philadelphia, a Pennsylvania congressman called a hearing in March to talk about improving pipeline safety.

Similar Pipes, Different Rules

When the owners of the Tennessee natural gas pipeline decided to expand the pipe in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania's northern tier, the federal safety rules they had to follow filled a book.

Explosion, Death, Reform

An advocate of more pipeline regulation said this year: "Until there is a rupture nearby and you can smell skin burning, people really don't pay attention." That has been the pattern throughout the history of government oversight of pipelines: explosion, death, reform. Here are some of the key...

Federal pipeline oversight agency was troubled from the start

When it comes to the small federal office charged with keeping U.S. pipelines safe, government auditors have been repeating themselves for more than three decades.

COMING SUNDAY:

COMING SUNDAY: Philadelphia and other cities have an aging network of old cast iron pipes to get gas to homes. These pipes blew up this year with fatal consequences in Philadelphia and Allentown.

COMING TUESDAY:

COMING TUESDAY: Community activists have begun to take on pipeline companies, but the industry is fighting back – and winning.

COMING MONDAY:

COMING MONDAY: So-called gathering lines are being built in large numbers in Pennsylvania to carry shale gas. They are large and move gas at high pressure – but don’t receive the same regulation as interstate pipelines.

Powerful Pipes, Weak Oversight

First in a four-part series.

Key Pipeline Accidents

Pipeline ruptures and accidents are relatively rare, but can be deadly. Here are some key gas accidents in the last 15 years in areas under the jurisdiction of federal regulators.

Ambitious U.S. gas pipeline illustrates hazards

Finished in 2009 at a cost of almost $7 billion, the REX natural gas pipeline - running from the gas fields of Colorado through Ohio to the edge of Pennsylvania - stands as one of the nation's most ambitious infrastructure projects in a quarter-century.

HOW “BATTLE LINES" WAS REPORTED

The Marcellus shale drilling boom has tapped a bounty of natural gas worth billions, but Inquirer reporters Joseph Tanfani and Craig R. McCoy found that thousands of miles of high-pressure pipelines carrying the gas to market are being installed with no government safety checks – no construction...