Thursday’s release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election provides a long-awaited view of the investigation’s findings. Attorney General William Barr released a four-page summary of Mueller’s report last month, offering a preliminary look at the probe’s findings but setting off demands for more information about the nearly 400-page document.

Barr’s summary said that the special counsel did not find that President Donald Trump or his campaign colluded with Russia during the election. Mueller did not take a position on whether the president had obstructed justice, stating that, while his report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” But the attorney general said that he and Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general who oversaw much of Mueller’s work, determined from Mueller’s evidence that there was not enough evidence to prove in court that Trump had obstructed justice.

» BREAKING IT DOWN: What we know and what we don’t

The release of the redacted report, however, is unlikely to end demands for even more information, as congressional Democrats have indicated they would press for an unredacted version.