There are few hot button issues in America as hot as gun control, something former Temple student Savannah Lindquist knows all too well. She became a gun rights activist after being raped in her Philly apartment, but her views have caused her to be dismissed and supported by both sides of the debate. Reporter Justine McDaniel’s look at how her experiences have shaped her outlook is an important read this morning. In other news, after instituting reforms to address mass incarceration, District Attorney Larry Krasner says his office is setting out to address another problem: mass supervision.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Savannah Lindquist, who said she was sexually assaulted when she attended Temple University, talks about the assault and her support for gun rights at her home in Norfolk, Va.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Savannah Lindquist, who said she was sexually assaulted when she attended Temple University, talks about the assault and her support for gun rights at her home in Norfolk, Va.

In 2016, Temple University senior Savannah Lindquist was raped in her North Philadelphia apartment.

She believes if she had had access to her handgun, left at home in Virginia because carrying the firearm on campus was illegal, she would not have been raped.

The traumatic experience shaped her views on gun rights, which have turned her into an activist with a rising profile. But her advocacy doesn’t fit neatly into a political box.

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has made clear his wish to end mass incarceration. His office has pushed towards that goal by seeking shorter sentences, diverting low-level offenses from the justice system, and charging crimes at a lower level.

Now he’s setting his sights on mass supervision, including probation and parole. The plan is to push for drastically curtailed terms of supervision with no parole lasting longer than incarceration.

Nationally, supervision is a major driver of incarceration. At the end of 2017, one in 22 adults in Philadelphia were on county supervision.

On Wednesday, the 76ers came back from behind to defeat the Boston Celtics, 118-115 for just their fourth victory in the rivals’ last 25 meetings.

That’s a big deal for fans, and for the team looking to reach the NBA Finals. Joel Embiid had a game-high 37 points to go with a career-high 22 rebounds while Jimmy Butler spent the fourth quarter making plays, including an 18-foot jumper with 5.5 seconds left.

Did the team just need a push to get there? Columnist David Murphy thinks Marcus Smart’s shove of Embiid in the third quarter changed everything.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

March 21, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
March 21, 2019

“Stand on both sides of the escalator. The others will follow. Counterintuitive as it may seem, this one change will help everyone get to the destination faster, especially when things are crowded.” — Mississippi State University professor of industrial and systems engineering Lesley Strawderman on how to settle the great escalator debate.

What we’re reading

Culatello from the Chicago-based Tempesta Artisan Salumi, sold at Di Bruno Bros.
Jackie Q. Botto
Culatello from the Chicago-based Tempesta Artisan Salumi, sold at Di Bruno Bros.

A Daily Dose of | Culatello

For years, the king of cured Italian meats was banned from the U.S. The ban has been lifted — but versions made right here are better.