As the weather warms up, students may already be counting down to the end of the school year. But, considering this morning’s Inquirer investigation on educator turnover, maybe some Philly teachers are, too. My colleagues’ report on turnstile teaching is a must-read about the effects of educator retention in city schools. In other, happier news, it may just be possible that a beloved independent book store planning to close in University City could survive.

And I have some news of my own: this morning will be my last writing this newsletter. I’ve so enjoyed chatting with you all each day and I leave you in the brilliant hands of my fellow newsletter writers. Be sure to send them your good vibes, thoughts and questions, and thank you for reading!

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Experts say a stable teaching staff is crucial to a school’s academic success, so why does Philadelphia churn through teachers? An Inquirer investigation has found that 26 district schools have turnover rates that far exceed a cause for alarm.

In other school news, for the past several years the district has prohibited school nurses from excluding unvaccinated students. Now the move worries nurses, given the recent local outbreak of mumps.

A move that is getting love: two Main Line school districts just opted to let teens get a later start to their school days.

There’s a hidden crisis lurking in Pennsylvania for the severely sick and mentally ill.

Pennsylvania’s Department of Human Services has struggled to reduce wait times for care at the last two state forensic psychiatric hospitals, where people with serious mental illness are cared for until they are competent for trial.

Those hospitals won’t accept individuals with acute medical needs, which means they’re effectively stranded in jail.

Earlier this month, the owners of Penn Book Center, a long-standing independent book store on the University of Pennsylvania’s campus, announced they were closing.

The wave of support that followed has been “quite overwhelming,” they say. But it’s more than just goodwill and shared memories.

As the store’s sales struggle in the age of Amazon, there might be hope of students, professors, and even the university stepping in to make it profitable again.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

Bill Day, Tallahassee, FL
Bill Day, Tallahassee, FL

“'Free college’ simply means that people who don’t attend college pay for those who do — because that’s what happens when the government raises taxes to make college ‘free.’ The plain truth doesn’t sound nearly as righteous or magnanimous as Warren’s version of the story.” — Antony Davies of Duquesne University and James R. Harrigan of the University of Arizona on Elizabeth Warren’s tuition plan.

  • A Washington state senator’s comments last week suggesting nurses just “play cards” shows why we need safe staffing laws, writes Maureen May, RN, president of the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals.
  • After the Kate Smith statue was removed from Xfinity Live!, Philadelphia could learn a lesson from Taiwan, writes Thomas J. Shattuck, an Asia Program research associate at the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

What we’re reading

Jay McClellan, right, an Arkansas native who now lives in East Falls, is the artist behind the 60 dog portraits that hang in the White Dog Cafes in University City and Haverford. He is in his home studio with the large painting he completed of his own dog, Ava Belle, a Blue Tick Coonhound, left.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
Jay McClellan, right, an Arkansas native who now lives in East Falls, is the artist behind the 60 dog portraits that hang in the White Dog Cafes in University City and Haverford. He is in his home studio with the large painting he completed of his own dog, Ava Belle, a Blue Tick Coonhound, left.

A Daily Dose of | Painted Pups

When Jay McClellan’s mother died, he gave up a career in advertising to pursue his passion: painting. Now you can see his vibrant portraits of man’s best friend at Anthropologie and White Dog Café.