That was some storm, huh? If much of the region is a bit sleepy this morning, blame those middle-of-the-night tornado warnings. No actual tornadoes were reported but the storm did take down power lines and trees, leading to outages in Philly and Delaware County. Now that the storm has passed, we’re ready to start the week. We’re kicking it off with a look at a city-run nonprofit and its lack of oversight; what City Council candidates want to do if they win; and how Philly experiences “everyday mass shootings.”

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

The Philadelphia Activities Fund, a nonprofit arm of the Department of Parks and Recreation, was established 25 years ago as an independent overseer for community funding requests.

The goal was to end the ethically fraught practice of letting Council members choose which groups in their districts deserve money. In the years since, the fund has distributed tens of millions of dollars.

Where does the money go, exactly? An Inquirer review suggests there’s been little, if any, oversight of the fund and individual council members still decide who gets the money. And it’s not just not-for-profit groups.

Philly’s laws are set by 17 people on City Council. This year, dozens of people are running for a spot.

In such a crowded race, fund raising can set a candidate apart. So can age, as a group of millennials vie to be the first on the Council.

But what about the issues? We asked incumbents and challengers what their first proposed bill would be if they win their party nomination May 21 and the general election this fall. Their answers touch on everything from tax abatement to rent control.

Mass shooting events in suburban settings involving multiple victims shot by the same person devastate communities and get a lot of public and political attention.

Shootings in Philadelphia often take place in different neighborhoods and involve different residents but send multiple patients to the same emergency room at once.

These patient clusters can be as devastating for communities and hospitals as single-site mass shootings. And when clusters are considered, a new study from Temple University has found that Philly has seen an average of nearly two mass shootings every month for the last 11 years.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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Opinions

April 14, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
April 14, 2019

“This shared grief reminds us of the extent to which an independent bookstore is rooted in its community. Like a plant, it’s shaped by its environment. ...The Penn Book Center is truly a collaboration between us and our customers.” — The owners of Penn Book Center on reactions to the closing of their independent bookstore.

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John Czerw pulls a kielbasa from the smokehouse at Czerw's, Tilton Street. Easter is a busy time at Czerw's, Swiacki's, Stock's, and other fixtures of Port Richmond's Polish comunity.
RON TARVER / Staff Photographer
John Czerw pulls a kielbasa from the smokehouse at Czerw's, Tilton Street. Easter is a busy time at Czerw's, Swiacki's, Stock's, and other fixtures of Port Richmond's Polish comunity.

A Daily Dose of | Kielbasa

It’s almost Easter and, in Pennsylvania’s Polish communities, that means it’s time for kielbasa. Lots and lots of fresh kielbasa.