Welcome back to the week, if you had the day off for Presidents’ Day. It was quite a busy holiday for New Jersey, Delaware, and 14 other states who have joined a lawsuit over the national emergency President Donald Trump declared last week. There is surely much more to come on that front. In other news, housing production in Center City had a strong showing in 2018, according to a new report. How and where it landed tells us a bit about where the city has been and where it’s headed.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

On Monday, 16 states, with Delaware and New Jersey among them, filed a lawsuit to stop President Donald Trump’s use of an emergency declaration to fund a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump declared the national emergency Friday in order to bypass Congress and shift billions from other budgets to funding construction at the border. The plan has drawn criticism on both sides of the aisle.

Meanwhile, protesters around the country used their Presidents’ Day to rally against the emergency declaration.

Not all high school graduations take place on a warm spring day. This month 100 young men and women participated in the Philadelphia School District’s mid-year graduation.

Every year, hundreds of city students earn high school diplomas through alternative routes.

One of them was Kishon Carter, who found his way to graduation, early college credits, and a career path, through the Community College of Philadelphia.

Breaking news: Millennials really like Center City. A new report shows 2018 had the strongest growth in housing production in Greater Center City since 2002, and it was driven by their demand.

The growth is modest compared to other cities and may be slowing, the Center City District report says. Each year the city still loses more people to the suburbs than it gains.

Want to dig into the details? Take a look at the map of where new developments ended up.

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Jazz bassist Mike Boone and his 12-year-old son, Mekhi, a drummer, pose before playing a gig together at Chris' Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia on February 12, 2019.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Jazz bassist Mike Boone and his 12-year-old son, Mekhi, a drummer, pose before playing a gig together at Chris' Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia on February 12, 2019.

A Daily Dose of | Jazz

Mike Boone, the 62-year-old bass great, has mentored many a young musician on Philly’s jazz scene. His latest protégé is special: it’s his 12-year-old son.