This morning’s news is all about the money. New Jersey is making it after sports betting became legal, stock market investors are losing it in the trade war with China, and Philadelphia-area manufacturers are feeling the heat as the cost of parts and labor rise. Plus, Mayor Jim Kenney took on his two challengers — State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams and former City Controller Alan Butkovitz — for an hour-long televised debate Monday night ahead of next week’s primary.

— Oona Goodin-Smith (@oonagoodinsmith, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

It’s officially been a year since the Supreme Court overturned the federal ban on sports betting outside Nevada, and New Jersey has hit the jackpot.

While Nevada is still king when it comes to sports betting revenue, New Jersey is closing in on the crown, drawing customers from New York and Philadelphia to both its retail outlets, and more importantly, online. But the odds are likely the Garden State’s early success will tumble after New York legalizes sports betting and Pennsylvania adds mobile access.

Sports writer Ed Barkowitz takes stock of the sports betting scene one year after the Supreme Court’s decision.

As the Trump administration’s escalated tariffs on Chinese imports take hold, Philadelphia-area manufacturers are feeling the pain. In Warminster, low-cost Chinese parts have made Teikoku USA Inc.'s grocery and frozen-food pumps competitive in the market.

But as the cost of parts and labor rise, the company still faces a strong demand to produce, struggling to fill orders on time because it can’t find enough factory workers.

After China retaliated in the explosive trade war Monday, the stock market slid, and neither side appears like they’re ready to compromise.

When they do, however, it may be the Philadelphia Orchestra that entices the Chinese to do business in the City of Brotherly Love.

The controversial soda tax is paying off for five Philadelphia schools, Mayor Jim Kenney and Superintendent William Hite announced Monday.

The five schools joined a pool of 12 “community schools,” earning them extra resources from the city’s Office of Education.

A signature initiative of the Kenney administration, community schools each target a different focus, embedding social services and other supports inside Philadelphia School District buildings in an effort to remove barriers to learning.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Filed under: “Perks of sitting in a window seat.” 🌇 Thanks for the photo, @travel_pel.

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

The Inquirer Editorial Board's endorsements for the City Council at-large seats in 2019.
Signe Wilkinson
The Inquirer Editorial Board's endorsements for the City Council at-large seats in 2019.

“City elections can signal a new chapter in the story of the city. While that’s not true of the somewhat sleepy mayor’s race, it certainly is of the race for seven at-large City Council seats. The highly-qualified field of 35 is notable for its youth, diversity, and direction, leaning decidedly progressive,” writes the Inquirer Editorial Board. Read its endorsements for city council at-large here.

What we’re reading

  • Has Philadelphia recovered from the MOVE bombing — where city officials dropped a bomb on a home on Osage Avenue in West Philly, killing 11 people including five children — 34 years ago? The only way to move past avoidance and numbing is to deal with the pain, writes Larry Platt for The Philadelphia Citizen.
  • Sharing a wall and backyard leads some Northeast Philly duplex owners to mark their spaces in distinct and imaginative ways. The Washington Post’s In Sight blog depicts this “border in the backyard.”
  • In this personal essay, Buzzfeed News showcases the rich, black culture of Southern hip-hop majorettes, the marching band front-liners recently highlighted in Beyonce’s Netflix concert film Homecoming, Lifetime’s Bring It! and more.
Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church located at 916 South Swanson St, in Philadelphia, April 24, 2019.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church located at 916 South Swanson St, in Philadelphia, April 24, 2019.

A Daily Dose of | History

As the nation’s birthplace, history is everywhere in Philadelphia. But how much of that dates back to the 1600s? Here’s where you can see 400-year-old buildings around the city.