Happy Presidents’ Day, friends. If you woke up with the Monday blues, you’ll want to pay special attention to my colleague Aneri Pattani’s latest story this morning. It’s all about college courses that aim to teach students to build stronger relationships and other skills known to boost happiness. It may just make you want to go back to school. Speaking of learning, Mayor Jim Kenney might need a lesson on public records. The way he’s using his personal cell phone could violate state open records laws.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

The University of Pennsylvania is where positive psychology, the scientific study of what goes well in life and how to cultivate more of it, really took off.

Now the school is bringing the practice to its undergraduate students through a new (and very popular) course.

You can’t exactly teach happiness, but research has shown teaching youth resilience and positive psychology can have a number of positive effects, from reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety to even improving grades.

Mayor Jim Kenney is just like you: he deletes text messages on his phone to clear space.

The problem with that? It may violate state open records laws.

Records of any communication relating to city business are intended to be preserved so citizens can see and understand how public officials govern and tax dollars are spent.

A yearlong Internal Affairs investigation laid blame on Philadelphia Police Inspector Raymond Evers and his supervisor Chief Inspector Anthony Boyle for a narcotics policy for flipping suspects into off-the-books confidential informants.

That policy eventually evolved into falsifying paperwork and hiding information from prosecutors.

Now defense attorneys are trying to figure out just how widespread the practice was — and how many cases it may have tainted.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Almost need some shades for those light trails, @shaynemalcolm. 😎

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

February 17, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
February 17, 2019

“It would be far better for political leaders to be the vanguards of reform rather than protectors of the same old rotten system.” — The Inquirer Editorial Board on why it’s time for Pennsylvania politicians to stop rigging elections.

What we’re reading

As cars went mainstream in the 1920s, the architecture of the filling station came into its own. Remarkably, many of these relics survive in Philadelphia, all in the same Mediterranean or cottage style February 10, 2019. TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: 1824 Sedgley at Kensington Avenue; 11th and Christian; 1641 N. 33rd, at Cecil B. Moore BOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: North Broad and West Cumberland; N. 20th, between JFK and Arch; Fifth and Monroe/Passyunk
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
As cars went mainstream in the 1920s, the architecture of the filling station came into its own. Remarkably, many of these relics survive in Philadelphia, all in the same Mediterranean or cottage style February 10, 2019. TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: 1824 Sedgley at Kensington Avenue; 11th and Christian; 1641 N. 33rd, at Cecil B. Moore BOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: North Broad and West Cumberland; N. 20th, between JFK and Arch; Fifth and Monroe/Passyunk

A Daily Dose of | Gas

You may have seen the tiny, early gas stations that dot Philly’s residential neighborhoods, but do you know the history behind their distinct designs?