As the opioid crisis continues, lawsuits are being filed across the country against opioid makers and distributors. Recent suits has revealed important information about a Philly-area pharmaceutical company and how the industry reports adverse effects. We’ve got the details for you this morning. In a very different drug story, we’ve taken a dive into New Jersey’s plan to legalize marijuana and why it sets itself apart from the plans of other states that have led the way, in ways advocates are and are not happy about.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Roughly 2,000 lawsuits against opioid makers and distributors are prying information loose about their role in the opioid epidemic.

That includes the revelation that Endo Pharmaceuticals, which has its U.S. headquarters in Malvern, reported more than 20,000 deaths associated with an opioid, Opana, to the FDA last year.

The deaths span roughly two decades and reports don’t necessarily causally link the product and the outcome. But they do highlight shortcomings of how the U.S. tracks safety risks for FDA-approved drugs.

New Jersey’s plan to legalize marijuana is looking quite different than those of the 10 states that have led the way. For one thing, it aims to correct racial and social injustices of the “War on Drugs.”

But in another deviation from most of the other legal weed states, the plan won’t allow for home cultivation. And the omission has infuriated cannabis activists.

Meanwhile, the dominant medical marijuana chain in Pennsylvania could soon be one of the largest industry retailers in the U.S. It plans to acquire grow operations in Reading and New Jersey.

In Philly’s upcoming primary election (mark your calendars: it’s May 21) more candidates are running for City Council than in any year since 1979.

And about one third of them are younger than 40, notable because Council currently has no member younger than 45. If elected, they’d bring a younger voice bring to city government.

A new study paints a more precarious picture for the city’s number of millennial residents. If job growth doesn’t keep up, it says, they’ll go elsewhere.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Never enough cherry blossom photos. Thanks for this one, @shaynemalcolm.

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

April 10, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
April 10, 2019

“But it’s clear, if numbingly unsurprising, that those who will profit from Mariner East ... had direct access to Pennsylvania government while the everyday citizens of Chester and Delaware counties getting a pipeline plopped down in their backyards did not.” — Columnist Will Bunch on why Pennsylvania needs to pull the plug on the Mariner East pipeline.

What we’re reading

Sherry Eichert (front left) Tulany China (middle) and Nina Schelchkova (right) play card matching game at Welcoming the Stranger in Episcopal Church of the Advent in Hatboro, PA, on Thursday, February 21, 2019.
ANTHONY PEZZOTTI / Staff Photographer
Sherry Eichert (front left) Tulany China (middle) and Nina Schelchkova (right) play card matching game at Welcoming the Stranger in Episcopal Church of the Advent in Hatboro, PA, on Thursday, February 21, 2019.

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A Bucks County non-profit is helping adult immigrants and refugees learn English, computer skills, and citizenship. And they do it all for free.