It may be April 1 but you won’t find any pranks here this morning. You will find the latest on comedian and media mogul Byron Allen’s lawsuit against Comcast and Charter Communications over carrying his cable channels. It could be taken up by the Supreme Court. You’ll also find a look at District Attorney Larry Krasner’s efforts to break Philly’s addiction to supervision with the help of local judges. Whether it will work has yet to be determined.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

"Actor and singer Jamie Foxx with Byron Allen at the Oscar Gala in February."
Entertainment Studios Networks
"Actor and singer Jamie Foxx with Byron Allen at the Oscar Gala in February."

At just 14 years old, Byron Allen got his start writing jokes for David Letterman and Jay Leno. From these humble beginnings he built up a Hollywood empire of eight cable networks, a movie studio, 43 syndicated TV series and more.

Yet Allen hasn’t been able to get his cable channels distributed to the homes of Comcast and Charter Communications customers.

Now Allen is suing both companies, alleging discrimination over the snub, and the U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to take up the case.

If the U.S. Census Bureau’s Philadelphia Regional Office has their way, you’ll be well versed in the benefits of filling out your census forms by the time they arrive next year.

It may feel like a lifetime away now, but communities across the country and region are already ramping up outreach efforts to make sure everyone is counted.

After all, hundreds of billions in federal money, seats in the U.S. House, and the boundaries of voting districts all depend on it.

Last month, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner announced a new policy to seek shorter terms of probation or parole. Pennsylvania, after all, allows for some of the longest probation terms in the nation.

Now he wants Philly’s Common Pleas and Municipal Court judges on his side.

He’s proposing sweeping action and is asking judges to consider closing out probation or parole cases early. Will they listen?

What you need to know today


Join Inquirer columnist Jenice Armstrong for a conversation about the Starbucks protests one year later at the next Inquiring Minds Tuesday, April 2. Get your free tickets here.


Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

This shot is a home run, @matthewscottbarber.

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

March 31, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
March 31, 2019

“Meaningful work requirements like these reduce idle dependence and promote employment. That’s precisely why they have a dramatic effect in helping families escape poverty.” — Robert Rector, a senior research fellow for the Heritage Foundation’s Institute for Family, Community, and Opportunity, on what the Green New Deal won’t do for poverty.

What we’re reading

Lion dancers lead the 2019 Chinese Hoyu Folk Culture Parade down 10th street toward the center of Chinatown on March 31, 2019. The parade and festival commemorates the 1189th birthday of General Humin, a guardian god to the Fujian people.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
Lion dancers lead the 2019 Chinese Hoyu Folk Culture Parade down 10th street toward the center of Chinatown on March 31, 2019. The parade and festival commemorates the 1189th birthday of General Humin, a guardian god to the Fujian people.

A Daily Dose of | Birthdays

Philadelphia’s Chinatown spent Sunday celebrating the birthday of General Humin, a guardian god to the Fujian people. He turned a spry 1,189 years old.