A Philadelphia Police Department inspector was put in charge of the Special Victims Unit, despite past sexual harassment complaints made against him by fellow officers. Rape victim advocates are stunned, but his supporters say his past isn’t a problem. Meanwhile, women of color are less likely to report an issue that impacts many mothers — postpartum depression. Research shows the fear holding them back may be justified.

When Philadelphia Police Department Inspector Anthony Washington was promoted in December, observers inside and outside of the department saw his role overseeing the Special Victims Unit as problematic.

Washington has been accused of sexually harassing female officers as well as a college student. He even went on to retaliate against cops who spoke out about his alleged behavior.

Police Commissioner Richard Ross expressed confidence in Washington’s ability to lead, despite the claims. City officials argue that prior allegations should have no bearing on Washington’s role and say that settlements paid by the city in lawsuits filed against him are not admissions of wrongdoing.

Postpartum depression affects one in seven women. There have been a number of recent advancements in the treatment of postpartum depression, but they can only help if the need for them is identified in the first place.

That’s proven to be a challenge for women of color and low-income moms, research shows. The numbers suggest they are several times more likely to suffer from postpartum mental illness, but less likely to receive treatment.

Professionals are working to break the stigma and fear keeping many mothers from admitting postpartum depression. But their greatest worry becomes somewhat understandable when you look at the majority of children that wind up in the foster-care system.

Philly’s opioid epidemic is now bringing one more health risk to the table — HIV. Experts say the number of HIV cases is on the rise among people who use IV drugs.

Thomas Farley, commissioner of Philadelphia’s Department of Public Health, said the increase in HIV cases “definitely has us concerned.”

The city is hoping to stem the tide by increasing testing in areas where people are known to inject drugs and by making more clean syringes available. Farley adds that a safe injection site could also play a vital role.

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Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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That’s Interesting

  • Joel Embiid was back from a three-game absence last night, but his impressive triple-double wasn’t enough to prevent the Sixers’ third-straight loss.
  • Among those taking in last night’s Sixers game was new Phillies slugger Bryce Harper who appeared on the court pregame and alongside some other Philly sports stars during it — making for quite the photo op.
  • Despite the rise of online shopping, a stretch near Rittenhouse Square has become a thriving business corridor in Philly. Still, a popular fast fashion retailer there has shut its doors — but not for the reason you might think.
  • With just two films, Jordan Peele has become a giant of horror. You can see nods to the greats before him in Us, but it’s what he does away from the screen that reminds movie critic Gary Thompson of names like Hitchcock and Serling.
  • Mariah Carey became the latest big name artist to set up shop at The Met Philadelphia. In true Carey fashion, her set included hits, humor, and the ultimate diva move.

Opinions

April 5, 2019
Signe Wilkinson
April 5, 2019

“Ultimately, we all want to live in a safe, just world, but pricing America’s poorest citizens out of the right to bear arms is not justice. It’s discrimination.” — Savannah Lindquist, Ladies of Liberty Alliance Development and Communications Coordinator, on inequalities of gun ownership.

What we’re reading

Costume designer Michele Clapton gave Vanessa Kirby's Princess Margaret a ball dress with a belt and pockets for a scene in the first season of Netflix's "The Crown." It's part of an exhibition that will run through Jan. 5, 2020, at Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library.
Ellen Gray/Staff
Costume designer Michele Clapton gave Vanessa Kirby's Princess Margaret a ball dress with a belt and pockets for a scene in the first season of Netflix's "The Crown." It's part of an exhibition that will run through Jan. 5, 2020, at Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library.

A Daily Dose of | The Crown

What are fans of The Crown to do as we wait for the lavishly produced drama to return to Netflix? How about a trip to see the show’s costumes at Delaware’s Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library.