Mike Newall has been writing for The Inquirer since 2010. Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y, Newall graduated from The Catholic University of America. He has been writing about Philadelphia crime, courts, politics, and neighborhoods since 2003. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and dog.

Latest Stories
Opinion

The 24-hour diner is dead. Long live the 24-hour diner. | Mike Newall

A late-night diner is where secrets are kept, where waitresses call each other family, and where lives are built.

Opinion

I went the distance with Philly’s running tour guide | Mike Newall

“No one’s going to break personal records,” Ian Thomas says. “But don’t show up in heels.”

Opinion

Lose the sarcasm, Mr. McSwain. Saving a life is no small thing | Mike Newall

Why such disdain for the idea of saving the lives of people in addiction?

Opinion

On one of Kensington’s worst drug corners, three religious groups try to keep the faith | Mike Newall

The police are playing Whac-a-Mole with the dealers right now. And Weymouth Street is the mole.

Opinion

The city’s solution to filthy streets is loud, odd, and very Philly | Mike Newall

Yes, we’re so afraid of asking people to move their cars that we’re going to deputize a small army of trash blowers to push rubbish under, around, and possibly over parked cars and into the path of street sweepers.

Opinion

In Kensington, neighbors are using disposable cameras to show a different side of their neighborhood | Mike Newall

The photos are one way to tell the wider story of a neighborhood, an act of art and agency. An $8.95 camera became a step toward reclaiming the narrative.

Opinion

Around Independence Mall, empty tables and thoughts full of worry | Mike Newall

It's not just federal workers feeling the pinch — it's the people who feed them, serve them and cut their hair who also are starting to hurt.

Opinion

After nearly a half century of service, an activist turned city honcho walks away, hopeful | Mike Newall

Mike DiBerardinis retires from a career that offered a front seat to the real story of Philadelphia, which is one of two cities.

Opinion

As East Market spruces up, an old barber moves on | Mike Newall

You can know the end is coming and still be surprised by it. Heartbroken, even. And Tony Martone is nothing if not heartbroken.