Police knock federal report on fatal Michigan bike crash

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FILE- In this June 9, 2016 file photo, mangled bicycles are tagged as evidence at the Michigan State Police crime lab in Kalamazoo, Mich. The National Transportation Safety Board says better communication between police agencies might have prevented the deaths of five bicyclists last year in southwestern Michigan. A pickup truck plowed into cyclists on a rural road near Kalamazoo last June. The NTSB says 22 minutes passed between the first 911 call about an erratic driver and the crash. The board says Charles Pickett Jr. might have been stopped if dispatchers for three police agencies had shared more information. (Mark Bugnaski/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP)

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) - Police agencies in Michigan are disputing a report by federal safety regulators who say better communication by 911 dispatchers might have prevented a crash that killed five bicyclists.

The Kalamazoo County sheriff and two police chiefs say the National Transportation Safety Board has done "a disservice" to everyone involved in the 2016 tragedy, including victims and survivors.

A group of bicyclists was struck by a pickup truck in Kalamazoo County's Cooper Township. The driver is charged with second-degree murder and driving under the influence of drugs.

The NTSB says there were three calls to 911 about an erratic driver before the crash but the information wasn't fully shared among dispatchers.

Kalamazoo County Sheriff Richard Fuller III said Thursday that dispatchers at three departments handled the incident appropriately.

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