Saturday, August 1, 2015

Specter with Harold Jackson




Former Sen. Arlen Specter sits down with Inquirer editorial page editor Harold Jackson.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
SHARE:
0
Letters to the Editor
ISSUE | FRACKING Question time It would be easier for me to support state House Speaker Mike Turzai's position opposing the implementation of a severance tax on shale gas if he would answer two questions ("Progress slows in Pa. budget talk," July 28). First, how would the drilling companies actually move our natural-gas deposits to a more tax-friendly state? And where, exactly, is such a state?
RAHA MOHARRAK was 25 when her parents said it was time for her to marry, but she decided she wasn't a toaster - as in "Ping! It's ready" - the Saudi Arabian woman told a U.S. audience recently. "I wasn't ready." Nor was she interested in giving up her job, car or independent life in Dubai, or up for the demeaning ritual in which "you get all dolled up, get onstage and dance at a wedding, and wait for some mom to see you and say, 'She's good for my son.' "