The story behind a viral Super Bowl celebration photo and a look at others that resemble fine art

Philadelphia’s own version of Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam unfolded — where else? — along Broad Street, shortly after the Eagles won their first-ever Super Bowl against the New England Patriots.

Maybe you’ve seen it: The now-viral photo has made its rounds all over the internet, showing two people touching fingertips while precariously hanging off of light poles down Philly’s main thoroughfare.

It was a right time at the right place kind of moment, said Neil Davis, the 23-year-old recent Rider University graduate from Cherry Hill, who took the original photo and noticed the uncanny resemblance to the painting.

Davis said he watched the game in New Jersey, but was Philly-bound no matter the outcome.

“Win or lose, I’m sitll going to Broad Street and I’m going to take pictures,” said Davis, who studied graphic design.

He made his way near City Hall and took the image. The next day, Davis uploaded the photo to social media, and his mother, Meryl Davis London, created the side-by-side image showing the hilarious similarities to the historical masterpiece.

He said he doesn’t know the two people in the picture, but wants to thank them.

Davis even has a title for the picture: The Creation of Super Bowl Champs.

But it’s not the only photo from Sunday’s festivities to be dubbed a fine-art doppelganger.

One photo shared by Twitter user @Trillburne compares an image of what appears to be fans climbing the gates of City Hall to a scene from Sergei Eisenstein and Grigori Aleksandrov’s 1928 Russian silent film, October: Ten Days That Shook the World, about the 1917 October Revolution.

The eeire comparison had been shared more than 6,000 times by Wednesday afternoon.

Another shows the Eagles players flocking Patriots’ tight end Rob Gronkowski after Tom Brady’s failed Hail Mary next to the 15th-century painting, The Torment of St. Anthony by Michelangelo.

TabloidArtHistory, a popular Twitter account that shows fine art and real life moments, retweeted a still of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia star Danny Devito as a red M&M from a Super Bowl commercial with a copy of the 19th-century painting Ophelia by John Everett Millais.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art shared Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky by Philadelphia-area artist Benjamin West with an Eagles jersey and Lombardi Trophy photoshopped on the 19th-century painting. The PMA would have had to loan that painting over to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston if the Patriots had won the Super Bowl, as determined in a friendly wager between the two institutions.

Into more of the fine arts? See how Google’s Arts and Culture app matched famous Philadelphians with museum paintings.