Friday, August 15, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Stewart set to race for the first time since August

Tony Stewart walks from his garage after practice for the Sprint Unlimited auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. (John Raoux/AP)
Tony Stewart walks from his garage after practice for the Sprint Unlimited auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. (John Raoux/AP)

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Tony Stewart is 20 pounds lighter and has a titanium rod in his surgically repaired right leg.

As far as he's concerned, those are the only major changes since he broke two bones in his leg in an August sprint-car crash. So when the green flag drops tonight at Daytona International Speedway for his first race since the accident, Stewart believes it will be the same old "Smoke" behind the wheel.

If he had any doubts - and he's insisted he doesn't - they were alleviated by 24 smooth laps in the first of two practice sessions last night for the exhibition Sprint Unlimited. All told, Stewart ran 50 laps - 125 miles - around Daytona.

"There's zero percentage of pain in the car. That was nice," Stewart said. "I thought we would have some kind of ache or pain, but it was like putting on an old pair of shoes again."

Stewart, who does not have a backup driver at Daytona, has not raced in more than 6 months. It's an unheard of amount of time off for a driver who makes his money racing in NASCAR yet crisscrossed the country cramming 50 or more weeknight events into his year-round schedule.

Fans above his garage stall cheered Stewart's arrival, and he was greeted by a sizeable media contingent at the car.

Stewart's layoff was certainly difficult, enhanced by the pain from his broken leg. He had two surgeries for the breaks, then a third to treat an infection. He was flat on his back, confined to the first-floor bedroom of his longtime business manager's house, where he was forced to lie with his leg elevated above his heart. When there was Stewart-Haas Racing business to address, team personnel did it at his bedside.

Stewart required an ambulance to get to his doctor appointments, and when he finally was able to get out of bed, he needed a wheelchair to get around.

Associated Press
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
Stay Connected