Minneapolis synagogue offers to host Eagles fans who want to worship on Super Bowl Sabbath

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Darchei Noam synagogue in St. Louis Park, Minn, is inviting observant Jews who are in Minneapolis for the Super Bowl to join them for the Sabbath before the big game.

If you believe the Eagles are living on a prayer for Super Bowl Sunday, then those going to the game Feb. 4 might want to join others of faith in appealing for a victory.

Congregation Darchei Noam, a Modern Orthodox synagogue in St, Louis Park, Minn., is offering Sabbath hospitality with meals and housing to observant Jews heading to Minneapolis for Super Bowl LII.

But be forewarned, observant Patriot fans also are welcome, says a spokeswoman for the synagogue.

“I’m really upset with” the Eagles, said Wendy Khabie, the synagogue’s chair of the marketing and communication committee. She and the congregation hoped to see the Vikings in the Super Bowl. “No matter what, our synagogue wanted to open our doors.”

It’s no secret that several of the Philly players feel a spiritual bond, often praying together. And it’s no secret that the team has fans on the pulpit.

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Khabie said the Vikings are not sore losers and want to welcome all those coming to the Super Bowl.

Darchei Noam’s rabbi is from Boston, and is a Patriots fan. Still, Philly fans are welcome, she said.

“Our rabbi is so good,” Khabie said. “You know the story of Solomon? He knows how to be fair and just.”

In a statement, Rabbi Max Davis said: “Despite the expected cold temperatures in our part of the country that time of year, Darchei Noam is one of the warmest places in town. If you’re lucky enough to have tickets to the game, we’d like to offer you an opportunity to spend Shabbos with our shul family.”

The Jewish Sabbath begins at sundown Friday and ends at sundown Saturday.

The offer is for faithful Jews who regularly attend services and want a place to worship while in the area. The congregation is small and can provide for about a dozen families. Guests who want to say a prayer for their team can do so, or as Khabie put it, “I’m not going to get into anybody’s silent meditation.”

The congregation is not hosting events on game day. Officials from the synagogue also plan to confirm the faith of those requesting accommodations, which will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, or to request housing, send an e-mail to superbowlshul@gmail.com.