Super Bowl XLVIII: Broncos coach John Fox and the curse of the 'reverse bye week'

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Denver Broncos head coach John Fox talks with reporters during a news conference Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Jersey City, N.J. (Mark Humphrey/AP)

JERSEY CITY, N.J. -- Denver coach John Fox is close to the end of the two weeks of preparation leading up to the Super Bowl, something he may be grateful for. As one of the only Broncos with Super Bowl experience, his wisdom boiled down to escaping the circus.

“The game gets fairly big on the outside, just dealing with that,” Fox said from the first floor of a three-story yacht on which the Broncos were speaking to the media. “Most teams do that as the spots get bigger as you go through the playoff season.”

"It's a little bit like as a kid when you went on a trip," Fox explained. "On the way there, it seemed like forever, and it was a little easier on the way home because you knew what to expect."

The waiting can seem interminable, Fox admitted, with the extra week between games.

"It is a little bit different as far as the timing of the game, both in the pregame and the halftime and the breaks that typically you have whether it's a playoff game or a regular season game," the coach said. "It’s a little bit of a mine field because you don’t do it any other time during the season. We call it a ‘reverse bye week.’”

According to Peyton Manning, part of the Broncos' preparations this season have included being screamed at by John Elway. The former Denver quarterback and current executive vice president of the franchise took exception to the Broncos' loss to the Seahawks in the preseason, and used the opportunity to express his distaste, verbally.

"I've had John talk to the team many times," Fox said. "He's got some great experiences that should be shared with football teams. He was our guest speaker before the San Diego playoff game. He always has a good message."

When the game actually gets here, Fox’s Broncos will be fully primed to tackle the Seahawks vaunted defense and Russell Wilson’s persistent offensive attack, which Denver has fallen victim to twice in the last year.

“When you turn on the tape long since that [preseason] game, you just see a very physical football team, no doubt. We’re expecting that,” Fox said. “We’re excited for that opportunity. Going back to the preseason, our second or third game, on the road, obviously they played that game better than we did. There’s many reasons for that. Turnovers was part of it. They played way better than we did.”

Fox's biggest lesson this week is based around reversing those fortunes: "You don't want to lose."