Thursday, December 25, 2014

Revisiting "America: What Went Wrong"

Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele are revisiting "America: What Went Wrong," their landmark 1991 series in the Inquirer, in a project with the Investigative Reporting Workshop. The project team will examine how four decades of public policy has shaped America's ongoing economic crisis.

Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele are revisiting "America: What Went Wrong," their landmark 1991 series in the Inquirer, in a project with the Investigative Reporting Workshop. The project team will examine how four decades of public policy has shaped America's ongoing economic crisis.
More reporting in the series
At the Foxxconn complex in Shenzhen, China, workers assemble electronic products. Among the items put together at the numerous factories there are iPods, iPhones, and iPads. (Kin Cheung / Associated Press, File)
At the Foxxconn complex in Shenzhen, China, workers assemble electronic products. Among the items put together at the numerous factories there are iPods, iPhones, and iPads. (Kin Cheung / Associated Press, File)
Barlett and Steele: After only one generation, the work of building and assembling Apple computers was turned over to laborers in China and other countries. Jobs that should have provided employment for Americans for decades to come were terminated.
In September 2010, with politicians of all stripes at all levels of government calling for programs to create jobs, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger took an unusual step for a public official about to leave office: He visited a factory to conduct a pep rally for its workers. Never mind that he could not seek reelection or that the workers could not vote for him. The Terminator was passionate about their efforts:
America: What Went Wrong? Veterans have always faced daunting problems in finding jobs, obtaining promised benefits, and meeting other challenges. But to those problems has been added the fear of losing their homes.
Barlett and Steele: Washington is obsessed with the budget deficit; it's all that lawmakers can talk about. There’s only one problem: Congress is wrought up over the wrong deficit.
Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele make the case that one of the more egregious falsehoods being peddled by the corporate tax cutters is that companies doing business in the U.S. are taxed at an exorbitant rate. Not so, they say.