Edward C. Adleman, 93, trucking executive and genial civic volunteer

Edward C. Adleman, 93, of Voorhees, N.J., who with his brother, Stanley, ran a trucking and film shipping and storage business, died Saturday, Dec. 2, of bladder cancer at his home in Lions Gate, a retirement community in Voorhees where he had lived for 10 years.

Camera icon Courtesy of the family
Edward Charles Adleman

For 65 years, Mr. Adleman and his brother were business partners in New Jersey Messenger Service in Philadelphia and the related entity, States Film Services, in Camden. The trucks carried movies to theaters for showing, and then back again to various storage depots scattered across the country and in Canada. The business is now defunct. Stanley Adleman died in 2013.

In addition, Mr. Adleman forged a business relationship with Tasty Baking Co. starting 1932. The trucks carried Tastykakes and other baked goods to distribution points nationwide.

Known for a wonderful sense of humor and genial manner, Mr. Adleman was a magnet for people. He had numerous friends, including fellow worshipers at Temple Beth Sholom in Cherry Hill, which he joined in 1947.

His affability made him a natural for volunteer work. He was active in the Variety Club, a charity which serves handicapped children. He also served as president of the Motion Picture Pioneers of Philadelphia, a professional organization.

Born in Camden, he was the son of  Meyer and Fanny Adleman. He attended public high school and Temple University before performing military service in the Army.

A busy civic worker, Mr. Adleman was a past president of the Jewish Geriatric Home, an honorary board member of Jewish Senior Housing and Healthcare Services, and a board member of the Jewish Community Foundation, all in New Jersey. He served on Temple Beth Sholom’s executive board and was still participating in many of the synagogue’s committees and activities into his 90s.

Mr. Adleman had myriad hobbies and interests. A stamps aficionado, he was founding president of the American Israeli Numismatic Society of South Jersey. He was also an amateur ventriloquist and was active in many philanthropic activities.

For 63 years, he was married to Cynthia Fisher Adleman. Two years after she died in 2008, he became friends with Janice Diamond Smith.

“He often expressed how fortunate he felt to have had two such wonderful women in his life,” said his son, Andrew.

Smith and Mr. Adleman were avid Phillies and Eagles fans, and followed them on TV. They traveled to Paris, London, and enjoyed many ocean cruises.

Mr. Adleman was preceded in death by his two brothers, a sister, and a nephew.

In addition to his son and friend, he is also survived by daughter Judith “Jude” Hobbs, a granddaughter, and nieces and nephews.

Services were Dec. 4 in Cherry Hill. Interment was in Crescent Memorial Park, Pennsauken.

Memorial donations may be made to the Cynthia and Edward Adleman Teachers Endowment Fund at Temple Beth Sholom, 1901 Kresson Rd., Cherry Hill, N.J. 08003.