Second Philly casino a go, GOP promises 'middle class' relief, what's next for SEPTA | Morning Newsletter

The Republican tax bill released Thursday would tax excess executive pay at nonprofits. Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, hands President Donald Trump an example of what a new tax form may look like during a meeting on tax policy with Republican lawmakers in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in Washington. At right is chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas.

It’s Friday, which means you’re thisclose to the weekend, and a chilly one at that. But don’t get ahead of yourself on those winter blues; forecasts suggest the Northeast will see a pretty mild winter. In the meantime, don’t miss our picks for what to do this weekend.

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— Aubrey Nagle

GOP promises to help the middle class, but who is that, exactly?

Camera icon AP Photo/Evan Vucci
The Republican tax bill released Thursday would tax excess executive pay at nonprofits. Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, hands President Donald Trump an example of what a new tax form may look like during a meeting on tax policy with Republican lawmakers in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in Washington. At right is chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas.

Republican leaders promise to help the middle class with their tax overhaul, revealed Thursday. Will it? Well, it depends how you define “middle class.”

In a 2016 study, Pew Research Center labeled “middle income” as those who make $42,000-$125,000 for a family of three. But it doesn’t always make sense to use the same definition of “middle class” for places as different as say, New York, Philadelphia, and Omaha. It’s apples to oranges.

One thing’s for sure: the big winners of this tax plan are big corporations and the super rich (unless you’re a nonprofit exec).

Path clear for second Philly casino

After years of fighting, SugarHouse Casino has ended its mission to block a second Philadelphia casino license after Gov. Tom Wolf signed a bill which basically invalidated their suit. Local community organizations agree South Philly hit the jackpot with the deal, as Stadium Casino LLC will build its Live! Casino and hotel near the stadiums. (Yes, that’s Live! like Xfinity Live!)

The proposed casino and hotel will include 200 hotel rooms, 2,000 slots and 125 table games. What happens next is up to Stadium, but they owe the house a cool $50 million for a slot machine license later this month.

Former Bordentown police chief charged with hate crime, free on bond

Federal authorities announced Wednesday that Frank M. Nucera Jr., former police chief of Bordentown Township, faces assault and hate crime charges after what the FBI calls “a significant history of making racist comments.” Today, he’s out on $500,000 bail to await trial on bias and civil rights charges.

If convicted, he faces a maximum of 20 years in prison and $500,000 in fines. As columnist Jenice Armstrong writes, the case is yet another example of what movements like Black Lives Matter are protesting.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

Camera icon Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com
Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com

“Whether or not fire hoses scatter the evidence, pushing scarlet pools down the storm drains and into the sewers, our streets are forever stained with the blood of the dead.  — Columnist Helen Ubiñas on the marks left behind by gun violence.

What we’re reading

  • Inside Philadelphia’s antifa: Being part of “black bloc” tactics means isolation and violence. [VICE]
  • Hundreds of researchers are trying to map every microbe on the planet. There’s about a trillion of them.  [Wired]
  • It’s been a year since the internet lost Twitter’s odd cousin, Vine. Where’d all the app’s creative types go? [The Ringer]
  • Sports Illustrated explains how (and why) it called the Astros’ World Series win with a 2014 cover. [Sports Illustrated]
  • NPR’s top news executive is one of many powerful men recently accused of sexual harassment. [The Atlantic]

Daily Dose of | Nostaglia

An artist spent the last seven years collecting memorabilia inspired by Baha Men’s 2000 hit “Who Let The Dogs Out,” and you can see it all at PhilaMOCA.