Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Abortion clinic cited by Pa. health department

First state and federal drug enforcement agents raided his clinic in West Philadelphia investigating suspected illegal distribution of prescription painkillers. Then the Pennsylvania Board of Medicine suspended Kermit B. Gosnell’s license to practice medicine citing "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions such as "blood on the floor and parts of aborted fetuses in jars." The board suspension notice also said a Gosnell employee with no medical license routinely dispensed prescription drugs and performed medical exams while he was out of the clinic.

Abortion clinic cited by Pa. health department

Kermit B. Gosnell
Kermit B. Gosnell

First state and federal drug enforcement agents raided his clinic in West Philadelphia investigating suspected illegal distribution of prescription painkillers. Then the Pennsylvania Board of Medicine suspended Kermit B. Gosnell’s license to practice medicine citing "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions such as "blood on the floor and parts of aborted fetuses in jars." The board suspension notice also said a Gosnell employee with no medical license routinely dispensed prescription drugs and performed medical exams while he was out of the clinic.

Now the state Department of Health has cited Gosnell’s clinic for 14 counts for violating state laws, including that it lacked required medical equipment and drugs to revive a patient in an emergency and that it had no easy way to get patients out of the building on an ambulance stretcher. The clinic could be permanently closed based on any one of the violations.

My colleague Marie McCullough reported that the health department’s findings added chilling detail to the earlier medical license suspension order that called the clinic “a clear danger to the public.”

She reported that Health officials reviewed records of 11 patients on whom Gosnell performed abortions between Nov. 19, 2009 and Feb. 19 — the day after the clinic was raided. Eight of those women were in the second trimester of pregnancy — 14 or more weeks. Three of those patients developed severe complications and had to be rushed by ambulance to a hospital. See her story here.

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