Friday, September 19, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Violence

A VIEW FROM THE INSIDE
Telling the stories
After many years of decline, the number of homicides and shootings in Philadelphia and some other cities is on the rise. Why is this happening? What is being done about it? How are children, families and communities touched by it? Through photos, stories and voices, The Inquirer is exploring the issue of violence and its repercussions.
STATISTICAL MAPS
This map looks at crime rates in the city, particularly in the city’s nine most crime-infested police districts, which are targeted for a new crime-fighting initiative.
Here is a map charting each of the city of Philadelphia's homicides by name of victim, age, race, weapon, date and location from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2007.

Interactive: Philadelphia homicides, 2006

This map shows people who were shot throughout the city of Philadelphia by age, race and sex from Jan. 1 to May 18, 2007. It also shows the time of the shooting.

Interactive: Shootings in Philadelphia, 2006

The Victims
This occasional series done by Inquirer staff photographer April Saul in 2006 attempts to capture the look, the sound, and the feel of the loss of children to violence.

Philadelphia Homicide Victims
Here is a table listing homicide victims from Jan. 1 to Nov. 30, 2006.
VIOLENCE IN PHILADELPHIA, 2004-2005
As homicide rates in many large cities are dropping, the number in Philadelphia has increased 11 percent since 2004 - one of the sharpest jumps in the United States. The number: 380.
Homicides of people under 18 had dropped precipitously between 1994 and the end of 2002 - from 50 a year to 21. But the deaths spiked in 2003 - up to 30. An Inquirer analysis found that of 129 people under 18 killed since 2000, more than half were killed by guns.
VIOLENCE IN PHILADELPHIA
Here is the prepared text of Mayor Street's speech Thursday night on his administration's response to the wave of violence in the city. He made the remarks during a televised news conference.
RESOURCES
2005 report from panel created by Gov. Rendell.

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