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Marcellus Shale

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A Marcellus Shale gas drilling site near Latrobe, Pa. Gov. Tom Corbett (right) has said he is open to a fee to aid host communities. (Laurence Kesterson / Staff Photographer)
Philadelphia ranked among the top 10 of 67 counties in the state for payouts, though there is no drilling within city limits.
 
Web: Information on 'impact fee' distribution
LATEST NEWS ON MARCELLUS SHALE
The state has a rare opportunity to control natural-gas extraction in Loyalsock State Forest, which sits atop some of the most productive land in the Marcellus Shale.
Output is expected to rise because many wells haven't yet been connected to pipelines.
Propane and ethane will arrive via pipeline to be processed and shipped to U.S. and overseas markets.
State universities in Pennsylvania could soon get a front-row seat on the Marcellus Shale industry.
LATEST NEWS ON MARCELLUS SHALE
 
BATTLE LINES SERIES: A SPECIAL REPORT FROM
Crews worked for months, cutting a trench through hilly fields, woods and past farms for a new natural gas line. But there was trouble and no one to call.
 
Ambitious U.S. gas pipeline illustrates hazards
 
Federal pipeline oversight agency was troubled from the start
When the owners of the Tennessee natural gas pipeline decided to expand the pipe in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania's northern tier, the federal safety rules they had to follow filled a book.
Dallas Township - an affluent suburb outside Wilkes-Barre - is just one battlefield in a war that has flared in more and more Pa. towns, over the proliferation of the new, high-pressure pipelines that carry Marcellus Shale gas to market.
Last in a four-part series.
There are thousands of miles of 100-year-old, leak-prone, cast-iron pipelines running under Pennsylvania streets. Last in a series.
 
Safety cases a secret for utilities, PUC
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HOW "BATTLE LINES" WAS REPORTED
The Marcellus shale drilling boom has tapped a bounty of natural gas worth billions, but Inquirer reporters Joseph Tanfani and Craig R. McCoy found that thousands of miles of high-pressure pipelines carrying the gas to market are being installed with no government safety checks – no construction standards, no inspections, and no monitoring. In fact, state and federal regulators don’t even know where many lines are located.


Marcellus 101
HYDRAULIC FRACTURING
Popularly called “fracking,” the process uses a mixture of water, sand and chemicals to blast open the shale rock, freeing gas trapped in tight pockets to flow to the surface.