Monday, December 22, 2014

Science

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Meet the donors, patients, doctors and scientists involved in the complex global network of rare – and very rare – blood.
In 50 years, researchers have turned up only 40 or so other people on the planet with the same precious, life-saving blood in their veins.
Protein Sciences Corp. joined a handful of other biotechnology companies racing toward a vaccine or treatment of Ebola, which has taken more than 5,600 lives in West Africa.
Ending months of input and speculation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday added to its list of threatened species a small shorebird called the red knot, whose round-trip migration of nearly 20,000 miles includes stops on Delaware Bay every spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs.
he number of test-tube babies born each year in the United States is underreported by states, complicating efforts by researchers to understand the risks associated with pregnancies resulting from in vitro fertilizations.
(TNS) KENNEDY SPACE CENTER – Atop the most powerful rocket available, NASA’s next generation space capsule Orion blasted off Friday morning...
Scientists say they found signs of the disease in Croatian skeleton that lived centuries earlier
Dust off your high-school physics knowledge for a moment, and recall the difference between batteries and capacitors. The former can store a lot of energy but take a long time to charge, while capacitors have more limited storage but can be charged in seconds.
Homo sapiens' ape ancestors long ago developed ability to eat fermented fruit, study suggests
Defect in growth hormone output can trigger an 'overgrowth' that leads to abnormal size
The dead were buried with sharp sickles across their throats meant to sever their heads if they tried to rise as vampires to prey on the living. Rocks were propped beneath their chins to keep them from biting.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Radical environmentalists who threw acid and smoke bombs at Japanese whalers were found in contempt of court for continuing their relentless campaign to disrupt the annual whale hunt off the waters of Antarctica.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Radical environmentalists who threw acid and smoke bombs at Japanese whalers were found in contempt of court Friday for continuing their relentless campaign to disrupt the annual whale hunt off the waters of Antarctica.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Radical environmentalists who threw acid and smoke bombs at Japanese whalers were found in contempt of court Friday for continuing their relentless campaign to disrupt the annual whale hunt off the waters of Antarctica.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - The company hired by Royal Dutch Shell PLC in 2012 to drill on petroleum leases in the Arctic Ocean pleaded guilty Friday to eight felony environmental and maritime crimes.
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Wind farm operator PacifiCorp Energy will pay $2.5 million in fines after pleading guilty Friday to charges related to the deaths of protected birds in Wyoming.
RICHMOND, Calif. (AP) - Large flames and white clouds of steam visible for miles from a San Francisco Bay Area refinery caused no harm to the surrounding community.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - A week before Christmas, Alaska's largest city should look like a postcard wonderland, and the last place you'd expect to see equipment making snow.
PRAGUE (AP) - Experts will meet in Kenya next month to discuss ways to save the critically endangered northern white rhinos from extinction.
PRAGUE (AP) - Experts will meet in Kenya next month to discuss ways to save the critically endangered northern white rhinos from extinction.
PRAGUE (AP) - Experts will meet in Kenya next month to discuss ways to save the critically endangered northern white rhinos from extinction.
A mile offshore from this city's high-rise condos and spring-break bars lie as many as 2 million old tires, strewn across the ocean floor _ a white-walled, steel-belted monument to good intentions gone awry.
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violated the Endangered Species Act when it approved a 22,000-acre logging project that affects northern spotted owl habitat in southern Oregon.
Now scientists say even blood can't escape the effects of aging. They found that the longer blood is stored in blood banks the stiffer it becomes.