Monday, September 1, 2014
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Saltwater marshes along the Jersey Shore and Delaware Bay, like marshes everywhere, are in trouble. For many reasons, including sea-level rise, they're becoming less marshy and more watery. They're drowning.
Some forecast models show it drifting toward the U.S. mid-Atlantic region.
A tropical system north of Haiti and the Dominican Republic is expected to gather strength over the weekend as it moves over the warm open waters near the Bahamas, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.
It could be a tomato game-changer: Scientists have discovered a gene that would allow commercial tomato plants to tolerate 24 hours of light a day.
A team of scientists there say they've captured the first samples of interstellar material - seven super-tiny particles of precious rock, perhaps from far distant exploded stars - that drifted into reach from beyond our solar system.
With the help of the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of researchers has spotted a "zombie star" lurking in deep space.
Researchers on Wednesday said a form of mummification was being carried out there more than six thousand years ago, much earlier than previously thought.
Rat study may shed light on Alzheimer's in humans, scientists say
You couldn't drink it. You couldn't bathe in it. You couldn't wash dishes in it. A bloom of toxin-producing, blue-green algae in Lake Erie had rendered the water unsafe and forced Toledo, Ohio, to shut down its system for several days.
Two new studies suggest rising populations for famous predators.
Perhaps it's time to come back out of the water – or maybe to visit the beach and celebrate the revival of a much maligned marine creature.
Can anymore ketchup be coaxed from the nearly-empty bottle? So many have tried and failed.
CHICAGO (AP) - Americans' eating habits have improved - except among the poor, evidence of a widening wealth gap when it comes to diet. Yet even among wealthier adults, food choices remain far from ideal, a 12-year study found.
BERLIN (AP) - A series of lines scratched into rock in a cave near the southwestern tip of Europe could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative than previously thought.
RENO, Nev. (AP) - For 10,000 years, a tiny iridescent blue fish has lived in the depths of a cavern in Nevada's desert. But a new study says climate change and warming waters - and its lack of mobility - are threatening its existence and decreasing its numbers.
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Life-sized figures sketched into red rock cliffs in Canyonlands National Park were drawn 1,000 years more recently than what had long been believed, a team of Utah State University scientists discovered about the world-renowned rock art.
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Life-sized figures sketched into red rock cliffs in Canyonlands National Park were drawn 1,000 years more recently than what had long been believed, a team of Utah State University scientists discovered about the world-renowned rock art.
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Life-sized figures sketched into red rock cliffs in Canyonlands National Park were drawn 1,000 years more recently than what had long been believed, a team of Utah State University scientists discovered about the world-renowned rock art.
A mile offshore from this city's high-rise condos and spring-break bars lie as many as 2 million old tires, strewn across the ocean floor _ a white-walled, steel-belted monument to good intentions gone awry.
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violated the Endangered Species Act when it approved a 22,000-acre logging project that affects northern spotted owl habitat in southern Oregon.
This year's unusually warm winter could cause large numbers of amphibians to die in Germany, an environmental organization said Tuesday.
Authorities in Costa Rica said Tuesday they are investigating the mysterious deaths of about 500 brown pelicans along the country's Pacific coast over the last five days but do not suspect bird flu was the cause.
Two conservation groups sued the federal government Tuesday claiming marine mammal regulators are not doing enough to protect polar bears and walruses against the combined threat of oil and gas exploration and global warming.
British Prime Minister Tony Blair and German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Tuesday the moment was right to come up with new measures to combat global warming and vowed that the world's industrialized countries would push strongly this year for new emissions goals.
When May Wang got her first glimpse of the effluent flowing from the Camden sewage treatment plant into the Delaware River, she was not impressed.