Monday, September 22, 2014
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U.S. government researchers working with divers and sonar equipment have located the wrecks of what they dubbed "forgotten ghost ships" in waters just outside San Francisco's Golden Gate strait.
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) - It was a calm morning in Antarctica's remote Ross Sea, during the season when the sun never sets, when Capt. John Bennett and his crew hauled up a creature with tentacles like fire hoses and eyes like dinner plates from a mile below the surface.
New genetic analysis reveals DNA from North Eurasians, researchers say
A pet goldfish named George was recovering "swimmingly well" after emergency surgery to remove a life-threatening head tumor.
Twin sisters Doris and Shirley Blumberg were top students at Philadelphia High School for Girls. They were especially sharp with numbers, joining an after-school club devoted to math games and puzzles.
It turns out that an animal very similar to those "Avatar" creatures, called Ikran, actually did exist here on Earth long ago.
Although it's far from the sort of brain transplant beloved by science fiction enthusiasts, scientists have taken one step in that direction: they have spliced a key human brain gene into mice.
A decade or so ago, Nancy Lewis put carpet in the basement of her Drexel Hill home. "It smelled like a new carpet," said Lewis, a lawyer. "We thought that was good."
When it wasn't putting T. rex to shame, the dinosaur Spinosaurus spent its time swimming - and chowing down on sharks.
Scientists have managed to "reset" human stem cells to their earliest state, opening up a new realm of research into the start of human development and potentially life-saving regenerative medicines.
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - NASA's Maven spacecraft arrived at Mars late Sunday after a 442 million-mile journey that began nearly a year ago.
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - NASA: Maven explorer arrives at Mars after voyage of nearly a year, enters orbit red planet.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Spurred chiefly by China, the United States and India, the world spewed far more carbon pollution into the air last year than ever before, scientists announced Sunday as world leaders gather to discuss how to reduce heat-trapping gases.
STOCKHOLM (AP) - Fearing that his Pacific island nation could be swallowed by a rising ocean, the president of Kiribati says a visit to the melting Arctic has helped him appreciate the scale of the threat.
PLACERVILLE, Calif. (AP) - A massive Northern California wildfire is burning so explosively because of the prolonged drought that firefighters are finding normal amounts of retardant aren't stopping the flames. And so they are dropping record-breaking amounts - more than 203,000 gallons in one day alone.
DENVER (AP) - A dazzling show of fire and color can make science come alive for young students, but it can also inflict serious and painful injuries, as flash fires in Nevada and Colorado showed this month.
DENVER (AP) - A dazzling show of fire and color can make science come alive for young students, but it can also inflict serious and painful injuries, as flash fires in Nevada and Colorado showed this month.
DENVER (AP) - A dazzling show of fire and color can make science come alive for young students, but it can also inflict serious and painful injuries, as flash fires in Nevada and Colorado showed this month.
A mile offshore from this city's high-rise condos and spring-break bars lie as many as 2 million old tires, strewn across the ocean floor _ a white-walled, steel-belted monument to good intentions gone awry.
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violated the Endangered Species Act when it approved a 22,000-acre logging project that affects northern spotted owl habitat in southern Oregon.
Two conservation groups sued the federal government Tuesday claiming marine mammal regulators are not doing enough to protect polar bears and walruses against the combined threat of oil and gas exploration and global warming.
British Prime Minister Tony Blair and German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Tuesday the moment was right to come up with new measures to combat global warming and vowed that the world's industrialized countries would push strongly this year for new emissions goals.
There is an 80 percent likelihood that the number of people on the planet, currently 7.2 billion, will increase to between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion by 2100.