State of the Union 2018: Recap, reaction and fact checks from Donald Trump's speech

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President Donald Trump gestures as delivers his first State of the Union address in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol to a joint session of Congress as Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan applaud.

President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address Tuesday night, urging lawmakers to come together to pass a $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan, pushing for national paid family leave and vowing to keep Guantanamo Bay open.

But Trump was booed by Democrats when he outlined his plan to overhaul the country’s immigration laws, which he claimed will “finally bring our immigration system into the 21st century.”

Trump’s immigration proposal involved four main points — offering a path to citizenship for 1.8 million undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children, building a wall along the border with Mexico, ending the visa lottery and shifting to a merit-based immigration system, and ending the priority given to family members of legal immigrants, which the president referred to as “chain migration.”

Reviews of Trump’s first State of the Union —a one hour, 21 minute-address that was among the longest in modern presidential history — were decidedly mixed. CNN host Van Jones said Trump “was selling sweet-tasting candy with poison in it,” while Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace called it “a powerful speech, well delivered.”

“I feel like he spoke more to his base than I expected him to, particularly on immigration,” said NBC Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd.

Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D., Mass.), the great-nephew of former President John F. Kennedy, delivered a strong rebuttal to the vision President Trump laid out during his first State of the Union.

“This place is not right. This is not who we are,” Kennedy said, giving the Democratic response in a scene that looked more like a political rally than a rebuttal to Trump’s address. “Many have spent the last year anxious, angry, afraid… This administration isn’t just targeting the laws that protect us. They are targeting the very idea that we are all worthy of protection.”

Here’s a recap of Trump’s first State of the Union:

11:35 p.m. – Most tweeted State of the Union ever

According to Twitter, 4.5 million tweets were sent about the State of the Union, making it the most popular address for the social media network in its nearly 12-year history.

The top three tweeted moments, according to Twitter, were:

1. Trump declaring: “We stand for the national anthem.”
2. Trump’s discussion of his immigration-reform proposals
3. Trump’s comments on MS-13 and other gangs

11:21 – Trump used 16 new words in his address

According to the Washington Post, Trump used 16 words that had never been previously said by a president in a joint address to Congress, dating back to George Washington.

Among the first-time words Trump used in his address were “amputations,” “legend,” “opioid,” “spine” and “tormentors.”

Of course, Trump isn’t the first president to introduce new words to the history of presidential addresses. Barack Obama used the words “bisexual,” “lesbian” and “transgender” during his 2015 State of the Union speech, while President Bush’s 2002 State of the Union speech used “caves,” “daddy” and “firefighter” for the first time.

11:04 p.m. – Will Bunch reviews Trump’s first State of the Union

“A teleprompter just rolled off the best speech of Donald Trump’s presidency.” That’s what my colleague, columnist Will Bunch, wrote following the president’s first State of the Union address.

Bunch took issue in particular issue with Trump’s decision to hail the heroes of Houston’s flood and the Las Vegas and congressional softball shootings without mentioning climate change or America’s gun laws, “two of the many real-life problems that don’t exist in Trump World.”

But Bunch’s larger issue is with the State of the Union address itself, pointing out that the real news wasn’t Trump’s speech, but rather all the issues that continue to lurk in the background.

“Did I mention that the State of the Union is not good, not at all?” Bunch wrote. Read his entire column here.

10:55 p.m. – Democratic response: ‘This is not who we are’

Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D., Mass.), the great-nephew of former President John F. Kennedy, delivered a strong rebuttal to the vision President Trump laid out during his first State of the Union.

“This place is not right. This is not who we are,” Kennedy said, in a scene that looked more like a political rally than a response to Trump’s address.

“Many have spent the last year anxious, angry, afraid. We all feel the fractured fault lines across our country,” Kennedy said of the president’s actions on immigration. “This administration isn’t just targeting the laws that protect us. They are targeting the very idea that we are all worthy of protection.”

“You are part of our story,” he continued in Spanish. “We will fight for you and we will not walk away.”

10:42 p.m. – Early reaction from pundits

As you’d expect, reviews of Trump’s first State of the Union were mixed, depending on who was offering the opinion.

CNN host Van Jones said Trump “was selling sweet-tasting candy with poison in it.”

On Fox News, The Five co-host Juan Williams said he thinks Trump gave Democrats every “reason to sit on their feet and walk out early” while reacting to the address. His colleague, Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace, called it “a powerful speech, well delivered.”

“I feel like he spoke more to his base than I expected him to, particularly on immigration,” NBC Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd said following the speech.

10:31 p.m. – Trump gives a long speech

President Trump’s first State of the Union speech was among the longest in modern history, running one hour, 21 minutes.

Former President Bill Clinton holds the record for the longest State of the Union address. He spoke for one hour, 28 minutes during his 2000 speech, according to the American Presidency Project at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

10:24 p.m. – More fact checks from Politifact and FactCheck.org

10:12 p.m. – Signe weighs in

Signe Wilkinson, our Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist, is covering President Trump’s first State of the Union in her own distinct way.

Here are some of the cartoons she’s shared so far. Follow her on Twitter @SigneWilk.

10:08 p.m. – Trump’s immigration plan gets booed

Democrats in the chamber booed as Trump outlined his plan to overhaul the country’s immigration laws, which he claimed will “finally bring our immigration system into the 21st century.”

Trump’s plan involves four main points — offering a path to citizenship for 1.8 million undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children, building a wall along the border with Mexico, ending the visa lottery and shifting to a merit-based immigration system, and ending the priority given to family members of legal immigrants, which the president referred to as “chain migration.”

My colleague, columnist Will Bunch, took issue with Trump lumping immigrants in with MS-13 and other criminal gangs.

9:50 p.m. – Trump renews call for paid family leave

Trump renewed his call for national paid family leave to support working families with children, an issue that’s been heavily pushed by his daughter, Ivanka Trump.

As part of the administration’s budget proposal last March, Trump proposed a new entitlement that would fund six weeks of paid parental leave which would cover mothers, fathers and new adoptive parents. The proposal would have used state unemployment programs to distribute funds to eligible Americans, which some analysts said would force states to raise taxes.

This [proposal] seems very doable,” Marc Goldwein, senior vice president at the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, told NPR. “It’s just surprising to see them put forward a tax increase.”

9:39 p.m. – Trump raises issue of standing during national anthem

During a segment of his State of the Union speech highlighting 12-year-old Preston Sharpe, who decorated the empty graves of veterans with American flags in Redding, Calif., Trump returned to the issue of standing during the national anthem.

“Preston’s reverence for those who have served our nation reminds us why we salute our flag, why we put our hands on our hearts for the Pledge of Allegiance, and why we proudly stand for the national anthem,” Trump said, leading to a loud round of applause and cheers from Republicans, and some Democrats, in the chamber.

9:26 p.m. – Fact checkers keeping busy with State of the Union

As soon as Trump began his first State of the Union speech, fact checkers began weighing in on the truthfulness of the president’s comments.

FactCheck.org said the president’s claim that “we enacted the biggest tax cut and reform in American history” is false. According to the site’s fact checkers, it is the eighth-largest tax cut since 1918, and the fourth-largest when adjusting for inflation.

Meanwhile, PolitiFact rated Trump’s comment that “After years and years of wage stagnation, we are finally seeing rising wages” as false, noting that wages have actually be rising for three to five years.

Here are some other early fact checks:

9:10 p.m. – Few Democrats applaud Trump’s entrance

According to my colleague Jonathan Tamari, very few Democrats applauded President Trump’s entrance into the House, something Tamari described as “rare.” Rep. Bill Pascrell (D., N.J.) greeted the president’s entrance by holding up a pocket copy of the Constitution.

8:58 p.m. – 5 members of Supreme Court skipping speech

Only four of the nine Supreme Court justices are in attendance during Tuesday’s State of the Union.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has said she will not attend the speech because of a prior engagement. The same goes for Justices Anthony Kennedy and Sonia Sotomayor.

Justice Samuel Alito hasn’t attended a State of the Union since shaking his head in disagreement during President Obama’s 2010 address. Justice Clarence Thomas, also not in attendance, has called the State of the Union a partisan event in the past.

8:30 p.m. – Melania Trump arrived separately from the president

First Lady Melania Trump opted not to ride along with the president, which CNN reports is a break with longstanding tradition. Instead, the first lady rode to Capitol Hill with the guests she will sit with during her husband’s State of the Union address.

“In addition to holding a White House reception and photo opportunity for them, along with their friends and family, she is accompanying them to the Capitol,” communications director Stephanie Grisham said in a statement. “Once there, the first lady and Mrs. Pence will host a more intimate meet-and-greet to engage with them on a personal level prior to the speech.”

CNN’s Jim Acosta reported that White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the first lady traveled separately for “no reason other than she can greet the guests and he can go straight in.”

The First Lady and the President have not been publicly seen together since New Year’s Eve.

8:15 p.m. – Trump phrase came from Hillary Clinton?

Ahead of Trump’s first State of the Union speech, excerpts released by the White House revealed the president will declare this a “new American moment.”

Tommy Vietor, an Obama administration staffer and now co-host for Pod Save America, thought the line sounded familiar. He wrote on Twitter where he remembered the line from: a 2010 speech given by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to promote the policies of President Barack Obama.

Vietor also pointed out Clinton used the line during her 2009 Senate confirmation hearing, where she said she was “proud to be an American at the dawning of this new American moment.”

8:02 p.m. – Prominent Republican among those skipping Trump’s speech

Sen. Richard Burr (R., N.C.), the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, won’t be in attendance tonight during Trump’s first State of the Union Speech, according to CNN’s Jeremy Herb.

Burr, who has made a point of steering clear of the White House during the Senate’s investigation into Russian meddling during the 2016 election, will reportedly miss the event due to family matter.

At least 13 House Democrats have decided to boycott Trump’s address, including Rep. Jan Schakowsky (R., Ill.), who explained her decision Tuesday night to CNN Out in Front host Erin Burnett.

“At the podium will be a sexual predator,” Schakowsky said. “Let’s be honest about it.”

7:30 p.m. – Trump criticized NBC’s Chuck Todd, Lester Holt

During a traditional pre-State of the Union sit down with news anchors, Trump vented a bit about NBC News hosts Chuck Todd and Lester Holt, according to Politico’s Michael Calderone.

>> READ MORE: How television networks are covering the speech

Among other things, Calderone reported that Trump said Todd became “a monster” during an interview and accused Holt of editing their May 2017 interview (in which the president admitted having fired former FBI director James Comey in part over the “Russia thing”) to remove comments the president claimed were almost “Shakespearean.”

7:25 p.m. – White House releases excerpts

Ahead of the president’s speech, the White House released excerpts that reveal Trump will claim, “There has never been a better time to start living the American dream.”

Here is a round-up of several excerpts:

We want every American to know the dignity of a hard day’s work; we want every child to be safe in their home at night, and we want every citizen to be proud of this land that we love.

Tonight, I want to talk about what kind of future we are going to have, and what kind of nation we are going to be. All of us, together, as one team, one people, and one American family.

We have ENDED the war on American Energy – and we have ENDED the War on CLEAN COAL.  We are now an exporter of energy to the world.

Struggling communities, especially immigrant communities, will also be helped by immigration policies that focus on the best interests of American Workers and American Families.

Past experience has taught us that complacency and concessions only invite aggression and provocation. I will not repeat the mistakes of the past Administrations that got us into this dangerous position.

7:20 p.m. – You might notice some fashion statements

There’s going to be a notable difference in attire between Democratic and Republican congresswomen attending tonight’s State of the Union.

In a show of patriotism, Republican congresswomen plan to don red, white and blue “to show our support for the flag, and the country and the troops and to be a contrast,” Rep. Martha McSally (R., Az.) told USA Today.

Meanwhile, her Democratic colleagues in the House and Senate will wear black in a show of solidarity with the #MeToo movement and all “women who have been sexually harassed and abused,” Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (R., N.J.) said in a statement.

Congressional Black Caucus members will be wearing red pins featuring the name Recy, a reference to Recy Taylor, a black woman who was kidnapped and raped by a group of white men in Alabama in 1944. “It will serve as a strong message of defiance to those who have and continue to subject women to a toxic masculinity that has plagued our society for far too long,” a spokesman for Rep. Gwen Moore (D., Wis.) told the New York Daily News.

7 p.m. – Excerpts suggest bipartisan tone

Trump is expected to focus on pushing a $1 trillion infrastructure plan and call for a bipartisan compromise on immigration that trades protection for undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children for funding for a border wall.

“I’m telling you, the immigration is so easy to solve if it was purely a business matter, but it’s not,” Trump told news anchors Tuesday afternoon, according to a partial transcript released by the White House pool. “And I think that’s something that I’ve learned maybe more than anything else: You have to — you govern with all of the instincts of a businessperson, but you have to add much more heart and soul into your decisions than you would ever have even thought of before.”

“When you’re a businessperson, you don’t have to worry about your heart,” Trump continued. “You really do what’s best for you — you know, for almost purely monetary reasons.”

6:45 p.m. – Call for arrests

Despite Trump’s comments about needing to govern with “heart,” Rep. Paul A. Gosar, one of the president’s most ardent supporters, has called on U.S. Capitol Police to arrest any undocumented immigrants in attendance. Several Democrats, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) plan to bring DACA recipients to the State of Union.

>> READ MORE: Donald Trump’s State of the Union: Let’s hope for a lasting message and not a fleeting tweet | Editorial

“Of all the places where the Rule of Law needs to be enforced, it should be in the hallowed halls of Congress,” Gosar wrote on Twitter. “Any illegal aliens attempting to go through security, under any pretext of invitation or otherwise, should be arrested and deported.”

6:30 p.m. – Campaign donors to be publicized

In a new wrinkle, names of Trump campaign donors who ponied up $35 will flash across the screen during a live-stream of tonight’s State of the Union broadcast on Trump’s reelection website. According to the Republican National Committee, the fundraising pitch had generated $1 million in contributions as of Tuesday afternoon.