Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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When city officials pulled the trigger in 2012 by posting details online on gun-permit appeals, they considered it a public service. Now that data has become a $1.4 million public expense.
The city's financial watchdog greenlighted the mayor's financial plan.
Philadelphia's finances are improving and are likely to continue doing so through 2019. The Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority (PICA) board made that optimistic determination Monday when it unanimously approved the city's five-year plan.
It wasn't just "hundreds of dollars," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson now acknowledges. It was just over $10,000. But he still says that all the money donated to his Peace Not Guns group was handled honestly, if somewhat sloppily, and that critics of its unauthorized use of a federal charity designation are missing the point.
It is common to rail against City Hall. Less so to want to tear it down. Philadelphians long harbored that desire. A 1929 plan called for making the municipal seat a traffic circle. A 1950s push to raze what was viewed as a monstrosity ended only because it would cost too much. As late as 1970, architect Louis Kahn labeled City Hall "the most disreputable and disrespected building in Philadelphia."
Mayor Nutter was tone-deaf to bad language during July 4 concert. Here's what he should've done.
For developer Greg Ventresca, eight acres of green, undeveloped land in Philadelphia's Roxborough neighborhood seemed like the perfect place for 48 new houses.
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane is investigating campaign contributions that a Reading mayoral candidate made to two Philadelphia City Council candidates on the same day he received $30,000 from the powerful electricians' union, Local 98.
For the second time, the Nutter administration has lost a bid to tax the money exotic dancers earn from giving "lap dances" - a move that could have cost three of Philadelphia's biggest strip clubs as much as $1.5 million.
After years of lobbying for more cabs that can handle wheelchairs, disabled people and their advocates Thursday got their wish: The Philadelphia Parking Authority will issue 45 taxi medallions for wheelchair-accessible vehicles by the end of the year.
When city officials pulled the trigger in 2012 by posting details online on gun-permit appeals, they considered it a public service. Now that data has become a $1.4 million public expense.
The city's financial watchdog greenlighted the mayor's financial plan.
Philadelphia's finances are improving and are likely to continue doing so through 2019. The Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority (PICA) board made that optimistic determination Monday when it unanimously approved the city's five-year plan.
It wasn't just "hundreds of dollars," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson now acknowledges. It was just over $10,000. But he still says that all the money donated to his Peace Not Guns group was handled honestly, if somewhat sloppily, and that critics of its unauthorized use of a federal charity designation are missing the point.
It is common to rail against City Hall. Less so to want to tear it down. Philadelphians long harbored that desire. A 1929 plan called for making the municipal seat a traffic circle. A 1950s push to raze what was viewed as a monstrosity ended only because it would cost too much. As late as 1970, architect Louis Kahn labeled City Hall "the most disreputable and disrespected building in Philadelphia."
Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled new rules for signage at construction and demolition sites.
Call it a sign of change: From now on, all Philadelphia construction and demolition sites must have large signs alerting the public to the work in progress and listing numbers to call to report a dangerous site.
UIL, the company Nutter hopes will buy PGW, is standing by the deal - for now.
Did L&I overbill hundreds of property owners in 2012? A new audit by City Controller's Office is raising that question.
When her husband died in December, Lauren Davis knew it was time to move. The rent on her rather tired Grays Ferry home was going up, and her landlord was not terribly responsive. The 63-year-old retired teacher's aide feared, however, that she did not have the means to relocate within her beloved neighborhood.