Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Which Nutter staffers stopped taking pay cuts?

Some readers asked which staffers are (and aren't) still taking pay cuts. You can find out after the jump.

Which Nutter staffers stopped taking pay cuts?

22 of Mayor Nutter´s top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts. Nutter, however, is still slashing his own salary.
22 of Mayor Nutter's top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts. Nutter, however, is still slashing his own salary.

It’s Our Money reported yesterday that 22 of Mayor Nutter’s top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts. Nutter and nine of his aides, meanwhile, are still slashing their salaries.

Some readers asked which staffers are (and aren't) still taking pay cuts. You can find out after the jump.

Mayoral spokesman Mark McDonald explained that while the city gave some staffers the choice between discontinuing and retaining their cuts, it automatically restored most staffers’ salaries in January.

McDonald said Nutter decided that his staff had given back sufficiently after pay cuts and a week of unpaid furlough in 2009 and 2010. Critics question whether the city has recovered enough to justify the decision.

Top staffers whose pay cuts have been discontinued:

  • Tumar Alexander, deputy chief-of-staff, whose salary went from $110,000 back to $115,789
  • Gloria Casarez, director of LGBT affairs, whose salary went from $77,000 back to $80,000
  • Rina Cutler, deputy mayor, whose salary went from $152,000 back to $160,000
  • Denise Dixon-Williams, executive assistant, whose salary went from $77,000 back to $80,000
  • Katherine Gajewski, director, whose salary went from $90,157 back to $95,000
  • Teresa Gillen, federal legislative-affairs director, whose salary went from $147,250 back to $155,000
  • Alan Greenberger, deputy mayor, whose salary went from $152,000 back to $160,000
  • Mary Horstmann, assistant managing director, whose salary went from $81,000 back to $84,156
  • Maia Jachimowicz, deputy policy director, whose salary went from $81,000 back to $84,156
  • Jazelle Jones, deputy managing director, whose salary went from $86,625 back to $90,000
  • Amy Kurland, inspector general, whose salary went from $142,500 back to $150,000
  • Travis Larrier, deputy education advisor, whose salary went from $80,850 back to $84,000
  • Joan Markman, chief integrity officer, whose salary went from $142,500 back to $150,000
  • Stephanie Marsh, legislative and government affairs coordinator, whose salary went from $90,091 back to $93,600
  • Kathleen McAfee, first deputy inspector general, whose salary went from $118,750 back to $125,000
  • Mark McDonald, press secretary, whose salary went from $114,000 back to $120,000
  • Christine Piven, director of scheduling, whose salary went from $75,075 back to $78,000
  • Lewis Rosman, director of legislative affairs, whose salary went from $123,975 back to $130,000
  • Jordan Schwartz, deputy chief-of-staff, whose salary went from $86,624 back to $90,000
  • Shelley Smith, city solicitor, whose salary went from $165,741 back to $174,464
  • Lydia Hernandez Velez, deputy managing director of aging, whose salary went from $86,625 back to $90,000
  • Dave Wilson, deputy managing director, whose salary went from $152,000 back to $160,000

Top staffers who are still taking pay cuts:

  • Everett Gillison, chief-of-staff, whose salary is $178,650 after an annual cut of $19,850
  • Suzanne Biemiller, first deputy chief-of-staff, whose salary is $152,000 after an annual cut of $8,000
  • Michael DiBerardinis, deputy mayor, whose salary is $152,000 after an annual cut of $8,000
  • Rob Dubow, finance director, whose salary is $165,741 after an annual cut of $8,723
  • Richard Negrin, managing director, whose salary is $171,000 after an annual cut of $9,000
  • Donald Schwarz, deputy mayor, whose salary is $152,000 after an annual cut of $8,000
  • Lori Shorr, chief education advisor, whose salary is $142,500 after an annual cut of $7,500
  • Gary Steuer, chief cultural advisor, whose salary is $156,750 after an annual cut of $8,250
  • Melanie Johnson, city representative, whose salary is $104,500 after an annual cut of $5,500
About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

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