Thursday, July 24, 2014
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UIL, the company Nutter hopes will buy PGW, is standing by the deal - for now.
When her husband died in December, Lauren Davis knew it was time to move. The rent on her rather tired Grays Ferry home was going up, and her landlord was not terribly responsive. The 63-year-old retired teacher's aide feared, however, that she did not have the means to relocate within her beloved neighborhood.
The family of Danny C. Johnson, 59, a truck driver and father of five who lived for 23 days after he was pulled out of the rubble of last year's Salvation Army thrift store wall collapse, filed a wrongful-death suit Tuesday against the charitable organization and others.
Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corp. (OARC), the controversial community development firm with ties to State Rep. Dwight Evans, has replaced its longtime chief executive officer, Jack Kitchen.
The city has agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle a class-action suit filed by gun owners whose information was posted online.
City Councilman James F. Kenney delivered another harsh letter to Mayor Nutter on Tuesday, flogging him for not yet signing into law a measure that would make possessing a small amount of marijuana punishable by only a $25 fine.
When city officials pulled the trigger in 2012 by posting details on gun-permit appeals online, they considered it a public service. Now the data have become a $1.4 million public expense.
The city's financial watchdog greenlighted the mayor's financial plan.
Philadelphia's finances are improving and are likely to continue doing so through 2019. The Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority (PICA) board made that optimistic determination Monday when it unanimously approved the city's five-year plan.
It wasn't just "hundreds of dollars," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson now acknowledges. It was just over $10,000. But he still says that all the money donated to his Peace Not Guns group was handled honestly, if somewhat sloppily, and that critics of its unauthorized use of a federal charity designation are missing the point.
Mayor Nutter said the musician would be honored for his efforts on homelessness and poverty.
Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corp. (OARC), the controversial community development firm with ties to State Rep. Dwight Evans, has replaced its longtime chief executive officer, Jack Kitchen.
"Ride-share" car services such as UberX and Lyft are transforming the taxi business in Philadelphia, and they don't even operate here. Yet.
The city has agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle a class-action suit filed by gun owners whose information was posted online.
The family of Danny C. Johnson, 59, a truck driver and father of five who lived for 23 days after he was pulled out of the rubble of last year's Salvation Army thrift store wall collapse, filed a wrongful-death suit Tuesday against the charitable organization and others.
Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled new rules for signage at construction and demolition sites.
Call it a sign of change: From now on, all Philadelphia construction and demolition sites must have large signs alerting the public to the work in progress and listing numbers to call to report a dangerous site.
UIL, the company Nutter hopes will buy PGW, is standing by the deal - for now.
Did L&I overbill hundreds of property owners in 2012? A new audit by City Controller's Office is raising that question.
When her husband died in December, Lauren Davis knew it was time to move. The rent on her rather tired Grays Ferry home was going up, and her landlord was not terribly responsive. The 63-year-old retired teacher's aide feared, however, that she did not have the means to relocate within her beloved neighborhood.