Wednesday, March 4, 2015

City

  • More Top Stories
  • Latest News
Six candidates gathered at the Convention Center for forum hosted by Next Great City Coalition.
En route to Temple University for another mayoral pitch, Lynne M. Abraham gazed up from the passenger-side window to admire the grand brownstones on Green Street in the Spring Garden section.
Plastic bags, bike-sharing programs, and Philadelphia City Council powers have not been big issues thus far in this year's mayoral race, but Tuesday night, they offered unexpected opportunities for candidates to stand apart.
Once a Democratic fund-raising wheeler-dealer who counted mayors and congressmen as friends, Samuel G. Kuttab took a hit to his reputation when a 2002 tax-evasion case sent him to federal prison for two years.
Sitting in a 12th floor office building overlooking City Hall, two of Nelson Diaz's staffers prepared him on how to pitch a room full of Millennials that evening.
Call it a mayoral race mystery -- Just how did former state Sen. T. Milton Street Sr. come to sign the nomination petition for former City Councilman Jim Kenney last week?
Efforts to settle a lawsuit that challenges the city's use of state civil forfeiture laws have failed, lawyers told a federal Judge Monday.
Police departments in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Chicago all practice stop and frisk, but some do better than others in making the data collected available to the public and in an accessible format.
Philly’s female firefighters and paramedics have grown accustomed to inappropriate comments, contact and discrimination from male coworkers and bosses, many say.
Democratic state Rep. Cherelle Parker, who is running to fill the 9th district council seat of her former boss and mentor, Councilwoman Marian Tasco, twice appealed the conviction.
En route to Temple University for another mayoral pitch, Lynne M. Abraham gazed up from the passenger-side window to admire the grand brownstones on Green Street in the Spring Garden section.
Six candidates gathered at the Convention Center for forum hosted by Next Great City Coalition.
Plastic bags, bike-sharing programs, and Philadelphia City Council powers have not been big issues thus far in this year's mayoral race, but Tuesday night, they offered unexpected opportunities for candidates to stand apart.
Once a Democratic fund-raising wheeler-dealer who counted mayors and congressmen as friends, Samuel G. Kuttab took a hit to his reputation when a 2002 tax-evasion case sent him to federal prison for two years.
Sitting in a 12th floor office building overlooking City Hall, two of Nelson Diaz's staffers prepared him on how to pitch a room full of Millennials that evening.
Heard in the Hall: Frank Rizzo Jr. on Monday became the first candidate in the crowded field vying for a seat on City Council to file his nominating petitions.
The ex-councilman is a top-tier candidate for mayor, so naturally his candidacy comes with questions.
The Philadelphia Republican party's leaders are wise to recruit young candidates, but the party itself faces an existential crisis.
Days after Bill Green defied Gov. Wolf by voting to approve new charter schools, the governor has stripped Green of his chairmanship of the Philadelphia School Reform Commission.
There was some disconnect between the mayoral candidates' questionnaires and their interviews following the PFT endorsement Q&As.