Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Powerful storms pound Philly region overnight, leave thousands without power

FILE PHOTO: Lightning touches down in the area around Lawrenceville, Pa., and the Strip district during an afternoon storm  on Tuesday, July 16, 2013. (AP)
FILE PHOTO: Lightning touches down in the area around Lawrenceville, Pa., and the Strip district during an afternoon storm on Tuesday, July 16, 2013. (AP)

Surprisingly powerful thunderstorms picked up punch overnight, causing heavy downpours that uprooted trees, flooded roads and left thousands without power across the Philadelphia region, South Jersey and the shore.

Crews quickly restored much of the lost power by this morning. The ferocious storm front that began brewing Monday night, grew in power as it moved slowly northeastward overnight into early Tuesday morning.

Philadelphia received almost 2.5 inches of rain in the 24-hour period that ended at 8:15 this morning.

Originally forecast to be sporadic and loosely organized, the storms caught many by surprise as they became highly organized and steady. They caused flooded streets in Egg Harbor, Atlantic County, sparked a lightning strike on a house in Island Heights, Ocean County, downed a tree in Lower Merion, Montgomery County, left cars submerged in Pottstown, Montgomery County and flooded part of the 8th and Market PATCO stop in Center City, according to various reports.

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  • SEPTA issued a notice early this morning that a downed tree pulled down power lines, forcing it to suspend outbound service from Center City to Thorndale on the Paoli/Thorndale Regional Rail Line. The service has since been restored, but commuters should expect delays up to 30 minutes.

    Camden, Chester and Montgomery counties were among the hardest hit by power outages.

    The National Weather Service in Mount Holly had no official rainfall amounts, but some areas were unofficially reporting rainfall totals of several inches or more.  A flood warning expired about 6 o'clock this morning and the heaviest appears to have moved on. The National Weather Service is calling for more rain, some heavy at times off-and-on later in  the day with a high of 87.

    It’s possible some areas will see another inch of rain before midnight. The heaviest rain should move in between 3 and 6 p.m.

    The rest of the week looks to be much better, with a chance you can give the air conditioner a break.

    Wednesday's forecast calls for sunny skies and a high of 86. Thursday looks to be even better with more sun and a high of 83.  The low could dip to to 61.

    Friday is expected to see continued sun with a high of 84.

    Frank Kummer PHILLY.COM
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