Sunday, December 28, 2014

Sandy-damaged N.J. towns prep for another storm

Grounds crews prepare a plane for flight at LaGuardia Airport Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in New York. Most airlines were giving up on flying in and out of New York, Boston and other airports in the American Northeast on Friday as a massive storm threatened to dump up to a meter of snow in some parts. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Grounds crews prepare a plane for flight at LaGuardia Airport Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in New York. Most airlines were giving up on flying in and out of New York, Boston and other airports in the American Northeast on Friday as a massive storm threatened to dump up to a meter of snow in some parts. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Story Highlights
  • Townships like Toms River and Brick have issued voluntary evacuation orders and are ramping up preparations.
  • The town's voluntary evacuation tells residents to leave the area by 6 p.m. today if they live in a low-lying area.
  • After Sandy, flooding and beach erosion are two big worries in the state.

The Jersey Shore isn't going to bear the brunt of this storm.

But the Superstorm Sandy-ravaged towns along the New Jersey coast are still being proactive ahead of the Nor'easter that's slamming New England and will drop snow, sleet and rain in most of the state and the Philadelphia area.

Townships like Toms River and Brick, which were slammed by Sandy in October, have issued voluntary evacuation orders and are ramping up preparations, with extra water-rescue trucks, ambulances, sandbags and firefighters ready.

"We don't mess around," said Paul Daley, acting emergency management coordinator in Toms River. "We just don't know how bad it's going to be."

The town's voluntary evacuation tells residents to leave the area by 6 p.m. today if they live in a low-lying area and don't feel comfortable staying. But during most flooding, people should be able to shelter in place, Daley said. 

Residents in flood-prone areas are advised to move their vehicles to higher ground. People in Brick can park their cars at any township-owned facility or public school.

Current forecasts call for South Jersey to see less than four inches of snow. Coastal towns in Central Jersey could get six to eight inches and northern parts of the state near New York City are expecting 10 to 14 inches.

After Sandy, flooding and beach erosion are two big worries in the state.

The National Weather Service says moderate flooding and "moderate to major" beach erosion is likely. A spokeswoman for the Ocean County Office of Emergency Management said the county was monitoring the Nor'easter closely, and Sandy prompted greater concern than usual.

Snow isn't expected to start falling along the Jersey coast until around 9 p.m. Until then, the area will see steady rain -- some places could get more than two inches, the weather service says. Wind gusts of up to 50 mph are also expected.

People who live in places prone to flooding should secure anything on their property that could float away, Daley said.


Contact Emily Babay at 215-854-2153 or ebabay@philly.com. Follow @emilybabay on Twitter.

Contact the Breaking News Desk at 215-854-2443; BreakingNewsDesk@philly.com. Follow @phillynews on Twitter.

Emily Babay Breaking News Desk
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