Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

How sequester cuts would affect Pennsylvania and New Jersey

President Barack Obama meets with Democratic Governors, Friday, Feb. 25, 2011, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
President Barack Obama meets with Democratic Governors, Friday, Feb. 25, 2011, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The White House has released state-by-state breakdowns of how the deep budget cuts set to go into effect this week would affect government agencies and programs.

The federal spending cuts, known as the sequester, are slated to go into affect Friday unless a budget deal is reached.

Here are examples of how funding in Pennsylvania and New Jersey would be affected, according to the White House's analysis:

  • Pennsylvania would lose $26.4 million in funding for primary and secondary education and New Jersey would lose $11.7 million.
  • About 2,290 fewer low-income college students in Pennsylvania and 650 in New Jersey would get work-study jobs.
  • Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for 2,300 children in Pennsylvania and 1,300 in New Jersey.
  • Pennsylvania would lose about $5.7 million in environmental funding that focuses on clean water, air quality and pollution prevention; New Jersey would lose about $4.9 million.
  • Thousands of civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed: 26,000 in Pennsylvania and 11,000 in New Jersey.
  • Army base operation funds would be cut by $7 million in Pennsylvania and $52 million in New Jersey. Also in New Jersey, Air Force base operation funds would be cut by $7 million.
  • Pennsylvania would lose $509,000 in grants for law enforcement, prosecution, courts and crime prevention; New Jersey would lose $336,000.
  • Pennsylvania would lose about $1.2 million in funding to upgrade its response to public health threats likes infections diseases and natural disasters. New Jersey would lose $840,000.
  • About 3,500 fewer people in Pennsylvania and 3,100 in New Jersey would be admitted to substance-abuse programs.

Contact Emily Babay at 215-854-2153 or ebabay@philly.com. Follow @emilybabay on Twitter.

Contact the Breaking News Desk at 215-854-2443; BreakingNewsDesk@philly.com. Follow @phillynews on Twitter.

Emily Babay Breaking News Desk
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