Friday, July 11, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Three missing Ohio women found a decade later, police ID suspects

Story Highlights
  • Three women escaped captivity Monday after one bravely attempted to get free.
  • Three brothers are in custody in the disappearances.
  • All three girls have been missing for 10 years.
Gallery: Three missing Ohio women found a decade later, police ID suspects

LATEST: Police identify suspects arrested | Girl found in home is Amanda Berry's daughter | Authorities probing how girls were taken, how they remained undetected | Reports: Women forced to have sex with captors

The woman's voice was frantic and breathless, and she was choking back tears. "Help me. I'm Amanda Berry," she told a 911 dispatcher. "I've been kidnapped and I've been missing for 10 years and I'm, I'm here, I'm free now."

Those words led police to a house near downtown Cleveland where Berry and two other women who vanished a decade ago were found Monday, elating family members and friends who had longed to see them again.

Three brothers are in custody in the disappearances, and law enforcement officials say they are probing how and why the girls were taken, and how they remained undetected in the home for so many years.

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  • Cleveland police identified the suspects this morning as 52-year-old Ariel Castro, 54-year-old Pedro Castro and 50-year-old Onil Castro.

    Officials said they would be charged within 36 hours.

    Ariel Castro was the owner of the house where the women were found. The other brothers lived elsewhere, police said.

    Ariel Castro, a former Cleveland school bus driver, had lived in the two-story house since 1992. He was arrested in 1993 for domestic violence, but a grand jury declined to indict him, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

    Police Chief Michael McGrath said he thinks Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were tied up at the house and held there since they were in their teens.

    Berry, now 27; DeJesus, now 23; and Knight, now 32, were taken to a Metro Health Medical Center. The three were released from the hospital this morning, according to the medical center.

    A 6-year-old girl also was found in the home. Authorities said this morning that she is Berry's daughter and the investigation into the girl's father was ongoing.

    The women were forced to have sex with their captors, resulting in multiple pregnancies that ended in miscarriages, police sources told the Cleveland television stations WKYC and WEWS.

    The women's escape and rescue began with a frenzied cry for help.

    A neighbor, Charles Ramsey, told WEWS-TV he heard screaming Monday and saw Berry, whom he didn't recognize, at a door that would open only enough to fit a hand through. He said she was trying desperately to get outside and pleaded for help to reach police.

    "I heard screaming," he said. "I'm eating my McDonald's. I come outside. I see this girl going nuts trying to get out of a house."

    Neighbor Anna Tejeda was sitting on her porch with friends when they heard someone across the street kicking a door and yelling.

    Tejeda, 50, said one of her friends went over and told Berry how to kick the screen out of the bottom of the door, which allowed her to get out.

    Speaking Spanish, which was translated by one of her friends, Tejeda said Berry was nervous and crying. She was dressed in pajamas and old sandals.

    At first Tejeda said she didn't want to believe who the young woman was. "You're not Amanda Berry," she insisted. "Amanda Berry is dead."

    But when Berry told her she'd been kidnapped and held captive, Tejeda said she gave her the telephone to call police, who arrived within minutes and then took the other women from the house.

    On a recorded 911 call Monday, Berry declared, "I'm Amanda Berry. I've been on the news for the last 10 years."

    She said she had been taken by someone and begged for police officers to come to the home on Cleveland's west side before the man returned.

    "I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for 10 years," she told the dispatcher. "And I'm here. I'm free now."

    Berry disappeared at age 16 on April 21, 2003, when she called her sister to say she was getting a ride home from her job at a Burger King. About a year later, DeJesus vanished at age 14 on her way home from school. Police said Knight disappeared in 2002.

    "Due to Amanda's brave actions, these three women are alive today," McGrath said at a press conference this morning.

    Ramsey, the neighbor, said he'd barbecued with the home's owner and never suspected anything was amiss.

    "There was nothing exciting about him — well, until today," he said.

    Attempts to reach Ariel Castro in jail were unsuccessful Monday. Messages to the sheriff's office and a jail spokesman went unanswered, and there was no public phone listing for the home, which was being searched by dozens of police officers and sheriff's deputies.

    The uncle said Ariel Castro had worked as a school bus driver. The Cleveland school district confirmed he was a former employee but wouldn't release details.

    Martin Flask, Cleveland's director of public safety, said this morning that authorities had had two prior encounters at the home. In March 2000, he said, Ariel Castro reported a fight in the area. And in January 2004, officials spoke with him about a child who was apparently mistakenly left on a school bus he drove.

    The women's loved ones said they hadn't given up hope of seeing them again.

    A childhood friend of DeJesus, Kayla Rogers, said she couldn't wait to hug her.

    "I've been praying, never forgot about her, ever," Rogers told The Plain Dealer newspaper.

    Berry's cousin Tasheena Mitchell told the newspaper she couldn't wait to have Berry in her arms.

    "I'm going to hold her, and I'm going to squeeze her and I probably won't let her go," she said.

    Berry's mother, Louwana Miller, who had been hospitalized for months with pancreatitis and other ailments, died in March 2006. She had spent the previous three years looking for her daughter, whose disappearance took a toll as her health steadily deteriorated, family and friends said.

    Councilwoman Dona Brady said she had spent many hours with Miller, who never gave up hope that her daughter was alive.

    "She literally died of a broken heart," Brady said.

    Mayor Frank Jackson expressed gratitude that the three women were found alive. He said there are many unanswered questions in the ongoing investigation.

    At Metro Health Medical Center, Dr. Gerald Maloney wouldn't discuss the women's conditions in detail but said they were being evaluated by appropriate specialists.

    "This is really good, because this isn't the ending we usually hear in these stories," he said. "So, we're very happy."

    In January, a prison inmate was sentenced to 4 1/2 years after admitting he provided a false burial tip in the disappearance of Berry. A judge in Cleveland sentenced Robert Wolford on his guilty plea to obstruction of justice, making a false report and making a false alarm.

    Last summer, Wolford tipped authorities to look for Berry's remains in a Cleveland lot. He was taken to the location, which was dug up with backhoes.

    Two men arrested for questioning in the disappearance of DeJesus in 2004 were released from the city jail in 2006 after officers didn't find her body during a search of the men's house.

    In September 2006, police acting on a tip tore up the concrete floor of the garage and used a cadaver dog to search unsuccessfully for DeJesus' body. Investigators confiscated 19 pieces of evidence during their search but declined to comment on the significance of the items then.

    Staff and wire reports
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