Sunday, September 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Holder headed to Ferguson, will oversee federal response to shooting

Activists in New York rally in solidarity with the protesters in Ferguson, Mo. A few dozen marched to New York City Hall with chants that included, "Hands up, don´t shoot!"
Activists in New York rally in solidarity with the protesters in Ferguson, Mo. A few dozen marched to New York City Hall with chants that included, "Hands up, don't shoot!" ANDREW BURTON / Getty Images
Activists in New York rally in solidarity with the protesters in Ferguson, Mo. A few dozen marched to New York City Hall with chants that included, "Hands up, don´t shoot!" Gallery: Holder headed to Ferguson, will oversee federal response to shooting

FERGUSON, Mo. - President Obama on Monday dispatched the attorney general to personally oversee the government's response to the fatal police shooting 10 days ago of an unarmed black teenager, the latest step in an extensive federal investigation that was expanding even as National Guard troops moved onto the restive streets of this St. Louis suburb.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. will meet Wednesday in Ferguson with some of the FBI agents and prosecutors who have already interviewed more than 200 people as they scour the area where 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a white police officer. Holder pledged "the full resources" of his department to investigate Brown's death, which has triggered unrest so severe that Missouri's governor on Monday called in the state's National Guard.

Behind the scenes, the administration worked to reassure some in the civil rights community that the nation's first black president sees the Ferguson crisis as an important moment. In a conference call Monday with civil rights groups, Holder and White House adviser Valerie Jarrett - perhaps Obama's closest confidante - said the case is a top priority.

"We are working tirelessly," Holder said, according to people on the call, describing how federal investigators have located more than 200 people in a week. He said the investigators are trying to determine whether there is enough evidence that Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson used excessive force and deprived Brown of his civil rights to support a federal criminal prosecution.

A senior federal law enforcement official said in an interview that the FBI's St. Louis field office has spoken to residents with information about the shooting who had not talked to local investigators. The federal probe, the official said, is "moving swiftly."

The developments came on a day when Obama addressed the chaos in Ferguson in starkly emotional terms at the White House, and Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon lifted the overnight curfew he had imposed on Ferguson, saying the imminent arrival of the National Guard would help restore order.

The day also featured revelations from competing autopsies of Brown's body - the official St. Louis County autopsy and another one requested by his family - both of which concluded that the teenager had been shot six times. Holder said a third autopsy was conducted Monday by the U.S. military.

Nixon had ordered the midnight-to-5 a.m. curfew two days earlier after a week of clashes between demonstrators and police following Brown's death on Aug. 9. He brought in National Guard troops after the most chaotic night yet Sunday, one marked by protesters shooting and throwing Molotov cocktails at police, and officers deploying tear gas.

The arrival of the Guard troops evoked images of the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War protests of the 1960s - when they were deployed to help integrate institutions in the South and restore order in burning cities - though the Guard is better known recently for its full-time roles in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Monday, the Guard's role contributed to what appeared to be the latest example of federal-state tensions in the response to Brown's death, which is also being investigated by state officials. A White House official said Nixon did not notify the administration before announcing his decision to call up the Guard.

Civil rights leaders said they were pleased by the administration's escalating response, saying it was a step forward for Obama's commitment to achieve racial justice. "Having the attorney general visit the site of an ongoing investigation is extra rare," said NAACP president Cornell William Brooks, who has been in regular touch with the White House over the last week. He added that the "U.S. government's pursuit of justice for this family is huge."

Emily Wax-Thibodeaux, DeNeen L. Brown, and Jerry Markon Washington Post
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