Thursday, August 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Rik Mayall | British comedian, 56

FiILE - This is a  May 31 2000 file photo of British comedian and actor Rik Mayall with his wife Barbara. Mayall, one of a generation of performers that injected post-punk energy into British comedy, has died. He was 56.  Mayall’s management firm Brunskill Management said the comedian died early Monday June 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Jordan/PA,File) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  PHOTOGRAPH CAN NOT BE STORED OR USED FOR MORE THAN 14 DAYS AFTER THE DAY OF TRANSMISSION
FiILE - This is a May 31 2000 file photo of British comedian and actor Rik Mayall with his wife Barbara. Mayall, one of a generation of performers that injected post-punk energy into British comedy, has died. He was 56. Mayall’s management firm Brunskill Management said the comedian died early Monday June 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Jordan/PA,File) UNITED KINGDOM OUT PHOTOGRAPH CAN NOT BE STORED OR USED FOR MORE THAN 14 DAYS AFTER THE DAY OF TRANSMISSION

Rik Mayall, 56, one of a generation of performers who injected post-punk energy into British comedy, has died.

Mr. Mayall's management firm Brunskill Management said the comedian died at his London home Monday.

In the 1980s, Mr. Mayall was part of the Comic Strip, a hugely influential group of alternative young comics that included Dawn French, Jennifer Saunders, and Mr. Mayall's writing and performing partner, Adrian Edmondson.

He was best known for cowriting and performing in The Young Ones, a sitcom about slovenly students that was much loved by those it satirized.

On television he memorably played Conservative politician Alan B'stard in the sitcom The New Statesman and lecherous Lord Flashheart in comedy classic Blackadder.

He and Edmondson also created and starred in Bottom, a surreally violent slapstick series about two unemployed slobs.

Film appearances included the title role in 1991 fantasy Drop Dead Fred - which gained him a U.S. cult following - and 1999 British comedy Guest House Paradiso.

"There were times when Rik and I were writing together when we almost died laughing," Edmondson said. "They were some of the most carefree, stupid days I ever had, and I feel privileged to have shared them with him. And now he's died for real. Without me. Selfish bastard."

The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. London's Metropolitan Police force said that officers were called to the house by the ambulance service Monday, but that the death was not believed to be suspicious.

- AP

 

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