MUSEUM
Penn Museum (University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology)
3260 South St. Philadelphia, PA 19104
215-898-4000
  • Calendar
    Upcoming events
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      Magic in the Ancient World
    • Saturday, December 10, 2016
    • This exhibit features a variety of a variety of artifacts once used by ancient peoples seeking to fulfill desires through supernatural means. See amulets, incantation bowls, curse tablets, rings and other items from ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome.
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      Kourion at the Crossroads: Exploring Ancient Cyprus
    • Saturday, December 10, 2016
    • Kourion, one of the ancient cities of the island of Cyprus, is the subject of this small exhibition curated by students for the Penn "Year of Discovery." Excavation records, photos, videos and artifacts highlight the Museum's work in Cyprus over a 20-year period starting in 1934.
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      An Ancient Egypt Celebration: Ancient Egypt Open House
    • Saturday, December 10, 2016
    • Penn Museum is in the spotlight with an all-new, free open access online course presented by the University of Pennsylvania on the Coursera platform: "Introduction to Ancient Egypt and Its Civilization." More than 20,000 people around the world have signed up for the first class. Dr. David Silverman, the Eckley Brinton Coxe, Jr. Professor of Egyptology, University of Pennsylvania, and Curator-in-Charge of the Egyptian Section at the Penn Museum, is teaching the course, which launches October 31 and will continue to be available on Coursera. This Open House is for all Introduction to Ancient Egypt and Its Civilization students within commuting distance--those who recently completed the course, and those planning to take it. Meet course professor David Silverman at the Museum. Activities include a short talk by David Silverman, Egyptian gallery tours, a workshop about mummification, a hieroglyph workshop, book signings--and Egyptian-inspired lunch offerings in the Pepper Mill Café. There are special activities for Penn Museum members, too. It is a celebration of all things ancient Egyptian, from the "virtual" to the REAL.
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      Afternoon Lecture: Middle Kingdom Clappers, Dancers, Birth Magic & the Reinvention of Ritual
    • Saturday, December 10, 2016
    • Dr. Ellen Morris, Assistant Professor of Ancient Studies at Barnard College, presents this American Research Center in Egypt - Pennsylvania Chapter talk. A Penn Egyptology graduate, Morris is the author of "The Architecture of Imperialism: Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom" as well as numerous articles dealing with topics as diverse as the relations between sexuality, performance, and power in ancient Egypt. In this talk, she employs hand-shaped clappers as a lens through which to explore women's roles in the cult of Hathor, in cosmic creation, and in the rejuvenation of kings. Clappers also shed light on birth magic, as these instruments appear to have been wielded on occasion in lieu of snakes by performers channeling one of the monstrous protectors of the sun-god.
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      In the Artifact Lab: Conserving Egyptian Mummies
    • Saturday, December 10, 2016
    • Part exhibition and part working laboratory, this exhibit allows visitors to see various archaeological tools and watch as conservators work on a wide array of Egyptian funerary objects. Staff will be opening their windows twice daily to answer visitor questions.
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      Second Sunday Culture Film Series: Language Is Culture Accents & Idioms Program (Deadly Ponies Gang, 2013)
    • Sunday, December 11, 2016
    • "The Deadly Ponies Gang (2013). Hip hop culture has been claimed around the world and translated into many hyper-local contexts. In this hilarious "documentary," Clint goes on a mission to get some teeth for his mate Wayne, with the help of rapper The Rhymestone Cowboy and others in rural New Zealand. Introduced and discussed by Dr. Bethany Wiggin, Instructor of German language, Penn Environmental Humanities Director, and Topic Director of the Penn Humanities Forum Translation theme for this year.
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      Family Second Sunday: Destination - Ancient Egypt
    • Sunday, December 11, 2016
    • To an ancient Egyptian, a magic wand protected a newborn child. Sculpt your own wand and write a hieroglyphic spell in the drop-in workshop. Discover other magical objects from ancient Egypt on a Look and Learn tour through the gallery at 1:00 pm or 3:00 pm. On Family Second Sundays, offered monthly October through May, guests are invited to join a Penn Museum educator to learn new perspectives about ancient and contemporary cultures through hands-on activities. Each Workshop includes a craft, touchable artifacts, and gallery activities.
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      Great Beasts of Legend Lecture Series - The Hobbits of Flores Island: Myth, Magic, Majesty of Homo Floresiensis
    • Wednesday, January 4, 2017
    • Dr. Janet Monge, Associate Curator and Keeper, Physical Anthropology Section, Penn Museum, offers this lecture in the "Great Beasts of Legend" monthly evening series. Standing at 3 1/2 feet tall and about 75 pounds, Homo floresiensis is the smallest adult skeletal specimen in the whole of human evolutionary history. Found in 2003, the "hobbit" or "halfling" was so named because of its diminutive size and the timely fascination with the Lord of the Rings films. Some have claimed that the hobbit is a pathological specimen, showing features of microcephaly, Down syndrome, or dwarfism. Others consider it to be a new species within the human lineage which became extinct when modern humans arrived on the island. There seems to be no end in sight on the debates that surround this hot button issue in human evolution. As recently as half a year ago, reanalysis of the cave deposits forced a new time frame for the sediments and fossils within the cave. Given the supporters and detractors, and the ensuing war in the literature, the hobbit find has confounded our view of human evolution. Beast, or ancestor?
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      Gallery Romp: Ancient Egypt
    • Saturday, January 7, 2017
    • Young children (ages 3-6) and their favorite grownups are invited to explore the Penn Museum's galleries through stories, crafts, and play. In January's Gallery Romp, children "set sail" down the Nile River, and learn about the origin of mummies through the tale of Osiris and Set. The workshop is limited to 25 people and purchasing tickets before the program is encouraged. Gallery Romps are free with Museum General Admission.
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      Family Second Sunday: Destination Ancient Guatemala - Maya Tattoos
    • Sunday, January 8, 2017
    • Every second Sunday of the month from October through May, families are invited to join a Museum educator to learn new perspectives about ancient and contemporary cultures through hands-on activities. In January, guests take inspiration from the Mexico and Central America Gallery and etch their own tattoos. The focus is on the ways the ancient Maya adorned themselves on a Look and Learn tour through the gallery at 1:00 or 3:00 pm. Drop-in program.
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