Find a Venue

MUSEUM
Penn Museum - University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology)
3260 South St. Philadelphia, PA 19104
215-898-4000
  • Calendar
    Upcoming events
    •  
      Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria & Iraq
    • Tuesday, January 23, 2018
    • Nimrud. Aleppo. Palmyra. Ebla. These ancient sites and many others in Iraq and Syria have found their way to the top of international news today, as the destruction of cultural heritage becomes both a by-product and a tactic of ongoing war. This new exhibition, created in conjunction with the Penn Cultural Heritage Center, sheds light on the ongoing destruction of cultural heritage in the Middle East by showing what's at stake- the rich history of the region and the diversity of its people-and what's being done to prevent the loss of this history and cultural identity. Fascinating ancient art and artifacts from the Penn Museum's extensive Near East collection tell stories of the cultures of Syria and Iraq through time. Contemporary artwork from Issam Kourbaj, a Syrian artist based in Cambridge, UK, provides an art intervention-a modern-day response to the artifacts and themes. The exhibition features the important work being done by the University of Pennsylvania and Smithsonian Institution in conjunction with individuals and groups in the Middle East to help combat the loss of irreplaceable cultural heritage.
    •  
      In the Artifact Lab: Conservation in Action
    • Tuesday, January 23, 2018
    • Part exhibition and part working laboratory, this exhibit allows visitors to see various archaeological tools and watch as conservators work on art and artifacts from the middle east. Staff will be opening their windows several times daily to answer visitor questions.
    •  
      Objects Speak: Media Through Time
    • Tuesday, January 23, 2018
    • This student-curated exhibition features 17 objects, drawn from the Penn Museum's collection and spanning more than four millennia, that impart messages expressing power, influence, and status through diverse media. Presented in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania's Year of Media, the exhibition makes connections between media of the past and of today.
    •  
      "What in the World?" Early Television Meets the World of Archaeology, 1950-1966
    • Tuesday, January 23, 2018
    • The Penn Museum Archives' new exhibition, offered in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania Provost Office's Year of Innovation, looks back at the pioneering Penn Museum television program "What in the World?" which aired on WCAU Philadelphia for more than a decade, and was syndicated nationally by CBS from 1951 to 1955. By means of photographs, letters, and other documents, as well as video clips from the few surviving episodes, the exhibition looks back at the highly original game show, offered to the public in the early days of television. Hosted by Penn Museum Director Froelich Rainey, the program featured a changing panel of experts from diverse fields, including such famous people as actor Vincent Price, artist Jacques Lipschitz, and anthropologist Carleton Coon, who worked together to puzzle out where in the world an artifact from the Museum's collections came from. Second floor Archives Corridor.
    •  
      Bearing Witness: Four Days in West Kingston
    • Tuesday, January 23, 2018
    • In May 2010, the "Tivoli Incursion," a standoff between Jamaican security forces and a local gang leader wanted for extradition by the United States government, resulted in the death of at least 75 civilians in West Kingston on the island of Jamaica. This new exhibition--part art installation, part memorial, and part call to action--sheds light on those events through compelling video and audio footage featuring firsthand accounts of people directly impacted by the violence.
    •  
      Urban Life in the Era of Climate Change
    • Wednesday, January 24, 2018
    • Ashley Dawson, author of Extinction: A Radical History, will speak about his newest book, Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change. Penn Sociologist Daniel Aldana Cohen, director of the Superstorm Research Lab and co-host of the climate politics podcast Hot & Bothered, will provide a response and conduct a conversation with Dawson about the environmental impacts of urbanization and gentrification, the increasing menace of urban flooding, and the emerging urban movements fighting for better forms of city living. Book signing to follow.
    •  
      Sleepover Program: 40 Winks With the Sphinx
    • Friday, January 26, 2018
    • Penn Museum's popular sleepover, 40 Winks with the Sphinx, invites guests on an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities are geared to take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on opportunities, through games and crafts, to explore ancient Egypt, the mummies and hieroglyphics, the ancient Greeks and Romans, the world of the ancient Maya, and more. An unforgettable experience for kids, ages 6 to 12, and their parents or chaperones!.
    •  
      Afternoon Lecture: The Marsha Bagoish Underwater Project
    • Saturday, January 27, 2018
    • Dr. Emad Khalil, Executive Director for the Center for Maritime Archaeology and Underwater Cultural Heritage and Professor of Maritime Archaeology, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt, speaks at this American Research Center in Egypt, Pennsylvania Chapter program at the Penn Museum. Anthropology Room 345.
    •  
      World Culture Day: Chinese New Year Celebration
    • Saturday, January 27, 2018
    • Woof, woof! Celebrate the Year of the Dog at the Penn Museum's annual Chinese New Year celebration! One of Philadelphia's oldest Chinese New Year celebrations, the daylong extravaganza is held in the China Gallery--home to a renowned collection of monumental Chinese art--and throughout the Museum. The whole family can enjoy traditional music and dance, tai chi and tangram workshops, a Shaolin-style Kung Fu demonstration, family gallery tours, storytelling, crafts and much more before the day ends with a drum roll, a roar, and the popular Grand Finale Lion Dance Parade.
    •  
      Penn Museum Playdate: Mummies & More
    • Tuesday, February 6, 2018
    • Come to the Penn Museum for an exploration of Ancient Egypt, visiting the sphinx, mummies, and more! The Penn Museum's newest program for young guests aged 3 to 5, Museum Playdates are offered monthly from February through April. Each one-hour program has a different theme connecting to one of the galleries, with activities designed for young learners: story-time and dramatic play in a gallery; art-making in a classroom; and a small snack. Full series schedule, including themes, is online: penn.museum/playdates.
    •  
      Sekere Workshop with Omomola Iyabunmi
    • Wednesday, February 7, 2018
    • Come and play at the Penn Museum with Philly's own master percussionist Omomola Iyabunmi on Wednesdays, February 7 through March 14, from 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm. Omomola Iyabunmi has pursued her study of African culture and percussion for more than 30 years. Her teachers have included Leonard "Doc" Gibbs, Baba Ibekunle Bey (Robert Crowder), Baba Ishangi Rasak, and Peache Jarman. All sessions are held in a gallery space, surrounded by ancient artifacts. The classes are for all ages and for all levels of playing. A limited number of sekeres will be provided. BYOS (bring your own sekere) recommended.
    •  
      Second Saturday at the Penn Museum: The Olympics
    • Saturday, February 10, 2018
    • In February, the Winter Olympics will be in full swing! Learn about the ancient Olympics at the Penn Museum through a special tour, play games in the galleries, make a special craft, and pick up a scavenger hunt that will challenge you to take a closer look at many objects in the galleries. Second Saturdays at the Penn Museum is an opportunity to explore the museum though tours, scavenger hunts, crafts, and more. Themes and activities change monthly.
    •  
      Alexandria in the Age of Augustus: The View from Cleopatra's Palace
    • Saturday, February 10, 2018
    • Travel back in time at this afternoon lecture at the Penn Museum. Though no papyri were ever found in Alexandria, a stack of circa AD 100 Greek papyri from Augustan Alexandria was found elsewhere, recycled as mummy "cartonnage" (covers). Dr. Peter van Minnen, Professor, Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati, discusses how these papyri are mostly concerned with agreements between individual Alexandrians, including Jews, women, freedmen, and slaves. Dr. van Minnen explores what these papyri can tell us about the social history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, about the apostle Paul, and about Jesus' garden-tomb. This is a program of the American Research Center in Egypt, Pennsylvania Chapter.
    •  
      Second Sunday Culture Film Series: Sonia's Dream (2015) & Other Short Films of Aymara Culture
    • Sunday, February 11, 2018
    • The Penn Museum's Second Sunday Culture Film Series continues under the theme of "Time Travel." Sonia Mamani, an Aymara chef, creates cuisine from traditionally gathered wild foods and brings her flavors to the big city, in this 2015 documentary, directed by Diego Saramiento Pagan. Other shorts explore how Aymara and Andean people thrive in the present. Mariana Giusti-Rodríguez, Cornell University, leads a discussion. The film series is presented in association with the Wolf Humanities Center's 2017-18 Forum on Afterlives. Sponsors for this program include Penn Spanish Studies, Penn Latin American and Latino Studies, Cinema and Media Studies, and the University Museum Library.
    •  
      Dragons of the North: The World of Viking Longships
    • Sunday, February 11, 2018
    • Enter the world of the Vikings at this free afternoon lecture at the Penn Museum. Viking ships are among the most remarkable artifacts in the entire realm of archaeological discovery, a dominant force in European history for three centuries between AD 800 and 1100. In recent years, ambitious projects in the field of experimental archaeology have involved the reconstruction and sea trials of many ancient Viking ships. Dr. John R. Hale, archaeologist and Director of Liberal Studies, University of Louisville, traces the ancestry of Viking ships back to sewn-plank canoes of the Scandinavian Bronze Age, and shows the links between these remarkable ships and the watercraft of the Pacific and central Africa. Program sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America Philadelphia Society.
    •  
      Chariot & Horse in the Ancient World
    • Monday, February 12, 2018
    • Go back in time to Roman chariot races at this free lecture at the Penn Museum. Dr. John R. Hale, archaeologist and Director of Liberal Studies, University of Louisville, has directed fieldwork at the extensive Roman horse farm of Torre de Palma in Portugal (modern Lusitania), where mosaic artists created portraits of five famous stallions. In this illustrated lecture, he shows how chariot-racing became the most popular sport in the ancient Roman world, when hippodromes like the Circus Maximus in Rome became the largest of all Roman public structures. Program sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America Philadelphia Society.
    •  
      Homeschool Day at the Penn Museum - Archaeological Adventures: Celebrate Africa
    • Wednesday, February 21, 2018
    • Discover more about the many countries, cultures, and languages across the continent of Africa at this Penn Museum program designed to help groups and families use the international collection at the Penn Museum to spark their students' learning. Examine African history more closely through a guided tour or Storytime Expedition in the galleries. Join an interactive workshop to learn more about both ancient and modern life in Africa. Celebrate the diversity of this continent through art and archaeology. Guests are encouraged to use the flexible format of hands-on workshops, guided tours, interactions with conservators, and more to shape a customized experience around their homeschool or cyber school curricula.
    •  
      Let's Talk about Sex(uality)
    • Wednesday, February 21, 2018
    • This post-Valentine's Day program at the Penn Museum moves past romance, inviting guests to explore sexuality and gender throughout the ages via the international collections--including Native American "two-spirit" objects brought out from storage by American Section Keeper William Wierzbowski and guided gallery tours. The evening concludes with a performance by dynamic drag queen Jasmine Anastasia. Cash bar.
    •  
      World Culture Day Series: Celebration of African Cultures
    • Saturday, February 24, 2018
    • Modern African dance and traditional African music, an African marketplace, a mancala game station, craft making for families and more converge at the Penn Museum's annual Celebration of African Cultures. Local griots and artists lead guests in an interactive exploration of traditions from across the African continent, set among the Museum's collection of textiles, sculpture, and masks in the Africa Gallery, and among statuary and tomb materials from 5,000 years of Egyptian culture in the Egyptian galleries.
    •  
      Cultured Meat & Three Futures for Flesh
    • Wednesday, February 28, 2018
    • Laboratory-grown meat, also called ‘cultured meat,' has loomed large in the public imagination ever since 2013, when the Dutch scientist Mark Post created the world's first cell-cultured hamburger. Could using cell culture and tissue engineering techniques to "grow" meat from samples of animal muscle solve many problems plaguing industrial meat production? Find out as Benjamin Wurgaft draws from years of ethnographic research within the world of cultured meat. He describes three versions of the future of flesh that cultured meat could bring about: the utopian, the dystopian, and the weird.
*