Friday, July 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Buzz: If you're cold, they're cold, too

Bailey, a 12-year-old yellow Labrador retriever, seems to be making a dog´s snow angel. Dorothy Bailer of Downingtown took Bailey to Marsh Creek State Park in Chester County on Wednesday, when Tuesday´s snow was vanishing quickly. (Michael S. Wirtz/Staff Photographer)
Bailey, a 12-year-old yellow Labrador retriever, seems to be making a dog's snow angel. Dorothy Bailer of Downingtown took Bailey to Marsh Creek State Park in Chester County on Wednesday, when Tuesday's snow was vanishing quickly. (Michael S. Wirtz/Staff Photographer)

CONTRARY to popular belief, pets' fur coats don't make them immune to the cold. Protect pets from winter's onslaught by shortening walks in extremely cold weather and bringing them indoors when temps drop below freezing, even if they have long or thick coats. Animals who are old or arthritic are more at risk of falling on snow or ice, and pets with conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease or Cushing's disease may have difficulty regulating their body temperature.

And cat lovers: Knock on the hood before starting your car to make sure you scare out any cats who may have sought shelter inside your vehicle when the engine was warm.

* Veterinarians at Colorado State University's James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital are studying a new stem-cell therapy that could provide a new treatment option for cats with chronic kidney disease. Earlier studies of the approach showed that it could decrease inflammation, promote regeneration of damaged cells, and improve kidney function.

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