Thursday, September 18, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

In France, it’s now illegal to work late

Unions and employers in France have come to a labor agreement that employees are not allowed to check their work-related emails after the work day.
Unions and employers in France have come to a labor agreement that employees are not allowed to check their work-related emails after the work day. iStockphoto

Eight-hour work days may seem like a thing of the past thanks to smart phones providing us the ability to always be “on,” but in France, they’re reinventing the typical work day.

Unions and employers in France have come to a labor agreement that employees are not allowed to check their work-related emails once the work day is done, the Guardian reports. Although the country adopted the 35-hour work week in 1999, workers have complained about having to clock in at home.

The deal, which is legally binding, affects 250,000 employees in the tech and consultancy industries, including workers at the French branches of Google, Facebook, and Deloitte.

Under the new law – which does not have a particular time requirement – employees cannot look at their computers, phone, or anything else that has work-related content once they step out of the office. Each company must also ensure that the workers don’t feel pressure to do so.

More coverage
  • High school interns on the rise
  • Should you negotiate your job offer?
  • In America, there’s no law that maximizes the number of hours we can work each week. According to Federal Reserve Economic Data, Americans work an average of 200 more hours per year than French employees.

    [The Guardian]

    Lauren Mennen Philly.com