Monday, July 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

High school interns on the rise

Ambitious college students need sharp elbows to nudge out the competition for internships: high schoolers.
Ambitious college students need sharp elbows to nudge out the competition for internships: high schoolers. Content That Works

Ambitious college students need sharp elbows to nudge out the competition for internships: high schoolers.

A total of 172 high school students, 4,597 college students and 326 employers responded to an online survey conducted recently by Internships.com and consulting firm Millennial Branding.

The respondents were “representatives of the millions of registered users of Internships.com,” reports Yair Riemer, vice president of Internships.com.

The survey found that 60 percent of employers agree that students will need to focus on their careers in high school to complete for internships and jobs in the future.

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  • The majority of high schoolers and college students – who were reporting on their high school experience – said that their parents pushed for them to find internships.

    Early internship interest may be stronger in some locales than others.

    “Students are extremely interested in this option,” observes Timothy Conway, director of school counseling at Lakeland Regional High School in Wanaque, N.J., who adds that “being in northern New Jersey and near New York City, this may be easier for us than others.”

    However, in Lincoln, Nebraska, interest from area companies in acquiring high school interns is generally minimal, reports Ruth Lohmeyer, counseling center team leader at Northeast High School.

    Currently, just two employers – one a hospital and one an engineering firm – are offering internships to high school students through the non-profit Nebraska Career Connections, Lohmeyer says.

    According to the survey, the three top reasons why companies are offering high school internships are to support local high schools, gain new ideas and to find future college interns.

    © CTW Features

    Marilyn Kennedy Melia CTW Features