Friday, September 19, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Jobs

Your employer may discourage you from discussing your compensation with your co-workers, but did you know it’s not actually illegal?
Given the money they make, given the power they have, chief executives need to struggle to avoid becoming tyrants, Krishna P. Singh told me during our Leadership Agenda interview published in Monday's Philadelphia Inquirer.
Now all I have to do is pee in the cup! It's a familiar refrain from job hunters who've just landed an offer.
It’s one of the more challenging pursuits of one’s career: Seeking out and finding a new job when you realize you’ve had enough of your current one.
Gimmicky or stunt resumes are almost always a terrible idea.
Before Krishna P. Singh, chief executive of Holtec International decided to expand in Camden, he flirted, seriously with South Carolina. Chief among its attractions was its workforce, Singh told me during our Leadership Interview published in Monday's Philadelphia Inquirer.
Q: I was serving in an interim leadership role for my team, and now am back in my original role since my new boss was hired.
WASHINGTON – Chris Fering has had what a savvy resume might describe as an eclectic and peripatetic career.
In Texas, there were 90 fatal injuries on the job in 2013.
If you’re hoping to earn more money this year, you need to do more than hope. It can take a lot of work to earn a raise, and it’s difficult to guarantee success.
Men dominate corporate hierarchy. Here are a few reasons:
Q: My problem involves the smokers who gather in front of our office.
Research shows that saying "thank you" is very powerful in the workplace, but only 50 percent of people express gratitude in the office.
Technology killed the switchboard operator, the lamp lighter and the ice cutter.
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