Payback time: Stylist behind 'Bonnie's' tresses files suit

In the days leading up to their November arrest, Philadelphia's "Bonnie and Clyde" got bold, sloppy and desparate.

Now the stylist that made Jocelyn S. Kirsch's tresses sing has teamed up with her employer, Giovanni & Pileggi LLC., to file the first lawsuit against Kirsch, 22, and Edward K. Anderton, 25, the high-livin' couple who allegedly fleeced at least 16 victims of nearly $120,000 during a year's time.

Jennifer Bisicchia, 25, and the salon are seeking repayment plus interest, late fees and attorney's fees for the $2,500 in famed hair extensions and gratuity, according to a civil lawsuit filed in Common Pleas Court on Thursday by attorney Arthur D. Goldman. The suit also seeks compensatory and punitive damages in excess of $50,000 for Bisicchia, who the suit says has had to endure emotional stress from the case.

Kirsch's attorney, Ron Greenblatt, has not seen the lawsuit and had no comment. Anderton's lawyer, Larry Krasner, did not return a call from the Daily News.

Kirsch and Anderton face federal charges of aggravated identity theft. Anderton pleaded guilty on June 2; Kirsch is expected to plead guilty later.

"They stole a lot of money from a lot people and [the victims] deserve to be made whole," Goldman said. Anderton and Kirsch "should have known better. They had the world handed to them on a silver platter and they abused their privileges."

Kirsch and Anderton's carefully constructed identity-theft scam began to show a few kinks shortly after Kirsch left the hair appointment last Nov. 29.

Bisicchia had applied pricey "Great Lengths" extensions to Kirsch over a 7 1/2-hour sitting, the civil complaint said. Kirsch and Anderton paid with a fraudulent credit card and two bad checks, including an 11 percent tip of $250 for the stylist, according to the documents.

The hairdresser made several calls to the couple's phone in an attempt to recoup the $2,500, court documents said.

Bisicchia's calls were answered in the middle of the night by text, some 12 hours before the pair's arrest.

"HELLO JEN BISICCHIA. YOU DON'T KNOW MY NAME. BUT I KNOW YOURS. I ALSO KNOW UR NICE PLACE ON ... ST AND HOW U GET HOME AT NIGHT. YOURE THE ONE WHO SHOULD BE WORRIED ABOUT VISITORS AT UR DOOR. YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOU'VE GOTTEN URSELF INTO. YOU SEEM LIKE A SMART GIRL. WALK AWAY NOW OR YOU WILL REGRET IT," the text read, according to the lawsuit.

Bisicchia became frightened and, according to the civil complaint, was "afraid that someone was outside of her house and/or that someone planned on breaking into the house."

Bisicchia had her boyfriend sit outside her front door until daylight, to calm her fears, the lawsuit said.

Later that day, Anderton and Kirsch were arrested. *